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The hidden adult : defining children's literature

Author: Perry Nodelman
Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
What exactly is a children's book? How is children's literature defined as a genre? A leading scholar presents close readings of six classic stories to answer these questions and offer a clear definition of children's writing as a distinct literary form. Perry Nodelman begins by considering the plots, themes, and structures of six works: "The Purple Jar," Alice in Wonderland, Dr. Doolittle, Henry Huggins, The Snowy  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Nodelman, Perry.
Hidden adult.
Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2008
(OCoLC)745176908
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Perry Nodelman
ISBN: 9780801889790 9780801889806 0801889790 0801889804
OCLC Number: 183179540
Description: x, 390 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. Six texts. Different texts, same genre --
Language : the text and its shadows --
Focalization : who sees and what they know --
Desire confronts knowledge --
Home and away : essential doubleness --
Variation --
Summary --
2. Exploring assumptions. Reading as an adult --
Making choices : exploring representativeness --
Assumptions about genre --
Genre and field --
Genre and genres --
3. Children's literature as a genre. Defining children's literature --
No genre --
Different but not distinct --
Literature and children --
For the good of children --
Literature for boys and literature for girls --
Middle-class subjectivity --
Doubleness --
Specific markers --
About children --
The eyes of children --
Simplicity and sublimation --
The hidden adult --
Narrator and narratee --
Showing, not telling --
Happy endings --
Achieving utopia --
Binaries --
Repetition --
Variation --
A comprehensive statement --
4. The genre in the field. Sameness and difference --
The sameness of children's literature --
Different children's literatures : the effects of personality and history --
Different children's literatures : the effects of nationality --
The genre in the field --
Distinctive texts in the genre --
Conclusion : children's literature as nonadult.
Responsibility: Perry Nodelman.
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Abstract:

What exactly is a children's book? How is children's literature defined as a genre? This title presents close readings of some classic stories to answer these questions and offers a definition of  Read more...

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A 'must' for any collection catering to librarians or any studying children's literature, especially at the college level. Midwest Book Review 2008 Without question essential reading for Read more...

 
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Linked Data


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schema:description"1. Six texts. Different texts, same genre -- Language : the text and its shadows -- Focalization : who sees and what they know -- Desire confronts knowledge -- Home and away : essential doubleness -- Variation -- Summary -- 2. Exploring assumptions. Reading as an adult -- Making choices : exploring representativeness -- Assumptions about genre -- Genre and field -- Genre and genres -- 3. Children's literature as a genre. Defining children's literature -- No genre -- Different but not distinct -- Literature and children -- For the good of children -- Literature for boys and literature for girls -- Middle-class subjectivity -- Doubleness -- Specific markers -- About children -- The eyes of children -- Simplicity and sublimation -- The hidden adult -- Narrator and narratee -- Showing, not telling -- Happy endings -- Achieving utopia -- Binaries -- Repetition -- Variation -- A comprehensive statement -- 4. The genre in the field. Sameness and difference -- The sameness of children's literature -- Different children's literatures : the effects of personality and history -- Different children's literatures : the effects of nationality -- The genre in the field -- Distinctive texts in the genre -- Conclusion : children's literature as nonadult."
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