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History of modern design

Author: David Seth Raizman
Publisher: Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson Prentice Hall, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This perceptive, wide-ranging book surveys the applied arts and industrial design from the eighteenth century to the present day, exploring the dynamic relationship between design and manufacturing, and the technological, social, and commercial contexts in which the relationship developed. This substantially revised and expanded second edition offers several new features, including: an updated and expanded timeline  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Raizman, David Seth.
History of modern design.
Upper Saddle River, N.J. : Pearson Prentice Hall, c2011
(OCoLC)742277271
Named Person: Josiah Wedgwood; Henry Cole, Sir; John Ruskin; William Morris; Charles Rennie Mackintosh; Frank Lloyd Wright; Jan Tschichold
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Seth Raizman
ISBN: 9780205728503 0205728502
OCLC Number: 557406920
Description: 432 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
Contents: Introduction: Thinking about design --
Pt. 1, Demand, supply, and design (1700-1800): --
1. Royal demand and the control of production: State-owned manufactories; Artists and craftsmen; Porcelain; The guilds; The printer's art --
2. Entrepreneurial efforts in Britain and elsewhere: Design in an expanding market; Wedgewood and antiquity; Commodities and fashion; The United States; Popular literature and the freedom of the press. Pt. II, Expansion and taste (1801-1865): --
3. Growing pains: expanding industry in the early nineteenth century: A culture of industry and progress; new materials and processes; Beyond the printed page; Wallpaper and fabric printing; The American system --
4. Design, society, and standards: Early design reform; Industry and its discontents; Reform and the Gothic revival; Henry Cole and the 'Cole Group'; The Great Exhibition of 1851; Images for all; Popular graphics in the United States; A balance sheet of reform; Conclusion. Pt. III, Arts, crafts, and machines- industrialization: hopes and fears (1866-1914): --
5. The joy of work: Ruskin, Morris, and the arts and crafts movement in Britain; Morris and socialism; Morris as publisher; The influence of William Morris in Britain; The arts and crafts movement in the United States; Printing in the United States; Chicago and Frank Lloyd Wright --
6. The equality of the arts: Design reform and the aesthetic movement; Books, illustration, and type; The Aesthetic movement in the United States; Dress; Design reform in France: l'art nouveau; Art nouveau in print and in public; Glasgow: Charles Rennie Mackintosh; Austria; Belgium; Munich; Scandinavia, Eastern Europe, and the vernacular; Italy and Spain --
7. Mechanization and industry: Design and workplace; Germany; The American system of manufacture and Fordism; Developments in merchandising, printing, and advertising; Conclusion. Pt. IV, After World War I: art, industry, and utopias (1918-1944): --
8. Paris and art moderne (art deco) before and after World War I: Furniture and modern art; Glass and metal; The Paris exposition of 1925 --
9. 'Modernism': design, utopia, and technology: Futurism; De Stijl; Constructivism; The Bauhaus; Beyond the Bauhaus; The printing industry and the 'new typography'; Jan Tschichold and the new typography; Britain and modern design; Scandinavia and modern design --
10. Design, industry, and advertising in the United States: Industrial design and Fordism; Advertising, art, and the selling of modern design in the Unites States; The United States and international modernism; Streamlining; The 1939 New York World's Fair; Photography and graphic design; Industrial design and austerity; Graphic design during World War II; Conclusion. Pt. V, Humanism and luxury: international modernism and mass culture after World War II (1945-1960): --
11. Modernism after World War II: from theory to practice: Promoting postwar design: art direction and the new advertising; Graphic design and technical information; Scandinavia and Britain; Italy; Germany; The international graphic style (Die neue grafik); Means and ends; Japan; Design and corporate culture; Trademarks and beyond --
12. Design and mass appeal: a culture of consumption: Detroit: transportation as symbol; Critics of styling; Resorts and luxury; Housing: suburbia, domesticity, and conformity; Beyond high and low art: revisiting the critique of mass culture; Conclusion. Pt. VI, Progress, protest, and pluralism (1961-2010): --
13. New materials, new products: Plastics and their progeny; Product housing; Sports equipment and progress; Visual identity, information, and art direction; Laminated materials; Nature and craft --
14. Dimensions of mass culture: Mass design and the home; Mass design: the fringes; Pop, protest, and counterculture; Graphics and the underground; Anti-design in Italy; Radical reform: technology, safety, and the environment --
15. Politics, pluralism, and postmodernism: Design and postmodernism; Postmodern products; Pluralism and resistance: punk; Hi-tech; The expanding definition and role of design --
16. Design in context: an act of balance: Consumer; Reform and social responsibility; Design, safety, and terror; Production technology: meanings of miniaturization; Design and softness; Materials technology and softness; Lifestyle; Politics, technology, and the media; Graphic design in a digital age; Craft: the persistence of process; Design and continuity: creativity, responsibility, and resilience.
Responsibility: David Raizman.

Abstract:

This perceptive, wide-ranging book surveys the applied arts and industrial design from the eighteenth century to the present day, exploring the dynamic relationship between design and manufacturing, and the technological, social, and commercial contexts in which the relationship developed. This substantially revised and expanded second edition offers several new features, including: an updated and expanded timeline and bibliography; inclusion of more recent trends and perspectives in design; a larger section on contemporary design; and more discussion of designed artifacts in relation to interior's rather than as stand alone 'objects,' to promote discussion of lifestyles and the experience of design by users. -- Book Jacket

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"David Raizman's History of Modern Design has assumed landmark status within design studies. Synthesizing design, technology, art history and social history, Raizman builds a cogent argument for Read more...

 
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