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A history of Portland's secondary school system with emphasis on the superintendents and the curriculum

Author: Edward L Polich
Publisher: 1950.
Dissertation: Thesis (M.A.)--University of Portland, 1950.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
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Material Type: Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript
Document Type: Book, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Edward L Polich
OCLC Number: 232551057
Notes: Reproduction of typescript.
Description: xi, 182 leaves ; 29 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Early settlers in the Oregon country --
Pioneer development of the Willamette Valley --
Development of the city of Portland --
The first school established --
Early agitation for free schools --
Land set aside for school purposes --
The private and denominational schools --
The first public school --
Organization of School District No. 1 --
The first new schoolhouse built --
The course of study in the early schools --
Establishment of the Portland high school --
The superintendent's role in education --
Mr. King elected first superintendent --
A new examination plan --
Regular attendance stressed --
The course of studies of this period --
State textbooks adopted --
Increased attendance creates a housing problem --
Foreign language study as a mens of improvement in English --
Criticism of Mr. King --
Summary --
Thomas H. Crawford elected superintendent --
Publicity of examinations eliminated --
The housing problem results in some new buildings --
New gradation plan --
Pupil-teacher training program established --
The controversy of 1880 and its results --
Summary --
Mr. J. H. Sawyer declines the position of Superintendent ; Miss Ella C. Sabin accepts --
Organizing the high school course of study --
The establishment and success of the night school --
Compulsory education legalized --
Mr. Irving W. Pratt as Superintendent --
Consolidation of school districts --
Administrative and financial difficulties --
Continuance of the night school --
The text-book scandal --
A liberalized high school course of study --
Summary --Frank Rigler, a dynamic superintendent --
Pupil-teacher training program revived --
New grading and classification system --
Positions of assistant superintendent created --
New buildings due to growth in population --
Teacher qualifications more rigid --
Manual training introduced --
The new East Side High School --
Domestic art and science introduced --
School of Trades established --
Jefferson High School opened --
Schools for special students --
Retirement fund for teachers --
Teacher tenure law passed --
New Lincoln High School completed --
Opposition to Mr. Rigler --
School survey 1913 --
Summary --
Mr. Alderman elected superintendent --
A more liberal policy of education --
Open-air and ungraded rooms introduced --
Franklin High School opened --
The new Benson School of Trades --
The High School of Commerce established --
St. Johns District annexed to Portland District --
The platoon system or two-group plan --
Music comes into importance in the schools --
America enters World War One --
Additional innovations and accomplishments --
Summary --
Mr. Daniel A. Grout becomes superintendent --
Mills Open Air School erected and opened --
Curriculum expanded at Girls' Polytechnic School --
School situation following the war --
Increased interest in athletics begins --
Additional elementary schools built --
The fraternity and sorority problem --
A new Administration Building --
New Roosevlth High School erected --
Washington High School destroyed by fire --
Grant High School constructed and opened --
Extensive building program continued --
Teachers pass approval upon textbooks --
Summary --
Mr. Charles A. Rice elected superintendent --
Introduction of the platoon plan --
New building program and period of expansion --
Department of Research established --
Corps of dentists and nurses employed by the district --
The needs for vocational education --
Department of Visual Education established --
New Girls' Polytechnic High School erected and opened --
The depression affects the system --
Visual aids come into use --
The new High School of Commerce completed --
The system adjusts itself --
Edison Six-Year High School opened --
Summary --
Mr. Ralph E. Dugdale succeeds Mr. Rice --
Mr. Norman C. Thorne in charge of curriculum revision program --
Monthly report cards scrapped --
New teachers' examination plan --
School for physically handicapped children established --
Extensive program of evening classes inaugurated --
Department of Guidance and Counseling established --
Heads of departments and supervisory positions abolished --
National defense program begins --
The United States enters World War II --
School population increases --
Summary --
Dr. Willard B. Spalding becomes superintendent --
In-service training program inaugurated --
Teachers' salaries increased --
Committee of the Whole established --
School population on the increase --
War production program management changed --
Creston School destroyed by fire --
"No flunking" philosophy in the system --
Emphasis on progressive education --
Day care of children program introduced --
Adult education increases --
Teacher shortage develops --
End of World War II brings new problems --
Financial difficulties arise --
New report card introduced --
Jane Addams and Sabin High Schools abolished --
Summary --
Dr. Paul A. Rehmus elected superintendent --
Kindergartens become overcrowded --
Survey of Portland teachers' working conditions was made --
New personnel elected to fill top administrative positions --
The voters approve a new building levy --
Extensive building program planned --
Lincoln High building sold --
School population steadily on the increase --
The secret society problem --
Building program begins --
Curriculum improvement continued --
Dr. Rehmus' views and opinions on curriculum --
Conclusion --
Vita.
Responsibility: by Edward L. Polich

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Linked Data


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schema:description"Mr. Alderman elected superintendent -- A more liberal policy of education -- Open-air and ungraded rooms introduced -- Franklin High School opened -- The new Benson School of Trades -- The High School of Commerce established -- St. Johns District annexed to Portland District -- The platoon system or two-group plan -- Music comes into importance in the schools -- America enters World War One -- Additional innovations and accomplishments -- Summary -- Mr. Daniel A. Grout becomes superintendent -- Mills Open Air School erected and opened -- Curriculum expanded at Girls' Polytechnic School -- School situation following the war -- Increased interest in athletics begins -- Additional elementary schools built -- The fraternity and sorority problem -- A new Administration Building -- New Roosevlth High School erected -- Washington High School destroyed by fire -- Grant High School constructed and opened -- Extensive building program continued -- Teachers pass approval upon textbooks -- Summary -- Mr. Charles A. Rice elected superintendent -- Introduction of the platoon plan -- New building program and period of expansion -- Department of Research established -- Corps of dentists and nurses employed by the district -- The needs for vocational education -- Department of Visual Education established -- New Girls' Polytechnic High School erected and opened -- The depression affects the system -- Visual aids come into use -- The new High School of Commerce completed -- The system adjusts itself -- Edison Six-Year High School opened -- Summary -- Mr. Ralph E. Dugdale succeeds Mr. Rice -- Mr. Norman C. Thorne in charge of curriculum revision program -- Monthly report cards scrapped -- New teachers' examination plan -- School for physically handicapped children established -- Extensive program of evening classes inaugurated -- Department of Guidance and Counseling established -- Heads of departments and supervisory positions abolished -- National defense program begins -- The United States enters World War II -- School population increases -- Summary --"
schema:description"Introduction -- Early settlers in the Oregon country -- Pioneer development of the Willamette Valley -- Development of the city of Portland -- The first school established -- Early agitation for free schools -- Land set aside for school purposes -- The private and denominational schools -- The first public school -- Organization of School District No. 1 -- The first new schoolhouse built -- The course of study in the early schools -- Establishment of the Portland high school -- The superintendent's role in education -- Mr. King elected first superintendent -- A new examination plan -- Regular attendance stressed -- The course of studies of this period -- State textbooks adopted -- Increased attendance creates a housing problem -- Foreign language study as a mens of improvement in English -- Criticism of Mr. King -- Summary -- Thomas H. Crawford elected superintendent -- Publicity of examinations eliminated -- The housing problem results in some new buildings -- New gradation plan -- Pupil-teacher training program established -- The controversy of 1880 and its results -- Summary -- Mr. J. H. Sawyer declines the position of Superintendent ; Miss Ella C. Sabin accepts -- Organizing the high school course of study -- The establishment and success of the night school -- Compulsory education legalized -- Mr. Irving W. Pratt as Superintendent -- Consolidation of school districts -- Administrative and financial difficulties -- Continuance of the night school -- The text-book scandal -- A liberalized high school course of study -- Summary --Frank Rigler, a dynamic superintendent -- Pupil-teacher training program revived -- New grading and classification system -- Positions of assistant superintendent created -- New buildings due to growth in population -- Teacher qualifications more rigid -- Manual training introduced -- The new East Side High School -- Domestic art and science introduced -- School of Trades established -- Jefferson High School opened -- Schools for special students -- Retirement fund for teachers -- Teacher tenure law passed -- New Lincoln High School completed -- Opposition to Mr. Rigler -- School survey 1913 -- Summary --"
schema:description"Dr. Willard B. Spalding becomes superintendent -- In-service training program inaugurated -- Teachers' salaries increased -- Committee of the Whole established -- School population on the increase -- War production program management changed -- Creston School destroyed by fire -- "No flunking" philosophy in the system -- Emphasis on progressive education -- Day care of children program introduced -- Adult education increases -- Teacher shortage develops -- End of World War II brings new problems -- Financial difficulties arise -- New report card introduced -- Jane Addams and Sabin High Schools abolished -- Summary -- Dr. Paul A. Rehmus elected superintendent -- Kindergartens become overcrowded -- Survey of Portland teachers' working conditions was made -- New personnel elected to fill top administrative positions -- The voters approve a new building levy -- Extensive building program planned -- Lincoln High building sold -- School population steadily on the increase -- The secret society problem -- Building program begins -- Curriculum improvement continued -- Dr. Rehmus' views and opinions on curriculum -- Conclusion -- Vita."
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schema:name"A history of Portland's secondary school system with emphasis on the superintendents and the curriculum"

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