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The history of Protestantism

Author: J A Wylie
Publisher: London : Cassell & Co., [18--]
Edition/Format:   Print book : English
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Genre/Form: History
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Wylie, J.A. (James Aitken), 1808-1890.
History of Protestantism.
London : Cassell & Co., [18--]
(OCoLC)755118296
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: J A Wylie
OCLC Number: 6513460
Description: 3 volumes : illustrations ; 27 cm
Contents: V. 1 Book first: progress from the first to the fourteenth century --
I. Protestantism --
II. Declension of the early Christian church --
III. Development of the papacy from the times of Constantine to those of Hildebrand --
IV. Development of the papacy from Gregory VII to Boniface VIII --
V. Mediaeval protestant witnesses --
VI. The Waldenses --
their valleys --
VII. The Waldenses --
their missions and martyrdoms --
VIII. The Paulicians --
IX. Crusades against the Albigenses --
X. Erection of tribunal of inquisition --
XI. Protestants before Protestantism --
XII. Abelard, and rise of modern skepticism --
Book second: Wicliffe and his times, or advent of Protestantism --
I. Wicliffe: his birth and education --
II. Wicliffe, and the pope's encroachments on England --
III. Wicliffe's battle with Rome for England's independence --
IV. Wicliffe's battle with the mendicant friars --
V. The friars versus the gospel in England --
VI. The battle of the parliament with the pope --
VII. Persecution of Wicliffe by the pope and the hierarchy --
VIII. Hierarchical persecution of Wicliffe resumed --
IX. Wicliffe's views on church property and church reform --
X. The translation of the scriptures, or the English Bible --
XI. Wicliffe and transubstantiation --
XII. Wicliffe's appeal to parliament --
XIII. Wicliffe before convocation in person, and before the Roman Curia by letter --
XIV. Wicliffe's last days --
XV. Wicliffe's theological and church system --
Book third: John Huss and the Hussite wars --
I. Birth, education, and first labors of Huss --
II. Huss begins his warfare against Rome --
III. Growing opposition of Huss to Rome --
IV. preparations for the council of Constance --
V. Deposition of the rival popes --
VI. Imprisonment and examination of Huss --
VII. Condemnation and martyrdom of Huss --
VIII. Wicliffe and Huss compares in their theology, their character, and their labors --
IX. Trials and temptation of Jerome --
X. The trial of Jerome --
XI. Condemnation and burning of Jerome --
XII. Wicliffe, Huss, and Jerome, or the three first witnesses of modern Christendom --
XIII. The Hussite wars --
XIV. Commencement of the Hussite wars --
XV. Marvellous genius of Ziska as a general --
XVI. Second crusade against Bohemia --
XVII. Brilliant successes of the Hussites --
XVIII. The council of Basle --
XIX. Last scenes of the Bohemian reformation --
Book fourth: Christendom at the opening of the sixteenth century --
I. Protestantism and medievalism --
II. The empire --
III. The papacy, or Christendom under the tiara --
Book fifth: history of Protestantism in Germany to the Leipzig disputation, 1519 --
I. Luther's birth, childhood, and school-days --
II. Luther's college-life --
III. Luther's life in the convent --
IV. Luther the monk becomes Luther the reformer --
V. Luther as priest, professor, and preacher --
VI. Luther's journey to Rome --
VII. Luther in Rome --
VIII. Tetzel preaches indulgences --
IX. The "theses" --
X. Luther attacked by Tetzel, Prierio, and Eck --
XI. Luther's journey to Augsburg --
XII. Luther's appearance before cardinal Cajetan --
XIII. Luther's return to Wittemberg and labors there --
XIV. Miltitz --
Carlstadt --
Dr. Eck --
XV. The Leipzig disputation --
Book sixth: from the Leipzig disputation to the Diet at Woms, 1521 --
I. Protestantism and imperialism; or, the monk and the monarch --
II. Pope Leo's bull --
III. Interviews and negotiations --
IV. Luther summoned to the Diet at Worms --
V. Luther's journey and arrival at Worms --
VI. Luther before the Diet at Worms --
VII. Luther put under the ban of the empire --
Book seventh: Protestantism in England from the times of Wicliffe to those of Henry VIII --
I. The first protestant martyrs in England --
II. The theology of the early English church protestants --
III. Growth of English Protestantism --
IV. Efforts for the redistribution of ecclesiastical property V.1 cont. V. Trial and condemnation of sir John Oldcastle (Lord Cobham) --
VI. Lollardism denounced as treason --
VII. Martyrdom of Lord Cobham --
VIII. Lollardism under Henry V and Henry VI --
IX. Rome's attempt to regain dominancy in England --
X. Resistance to papal encroachments --
XI. Influence of the wars of the fifteenth century on the progress of Protestantism --
Book eighth: history of Protestantism in Switzerland from A.D. 1516 to its establishment at Zurich, 1525 --
I. Switzerland --
the country and the people --
II. Condition of Switzerland prior to the reformation --
III. Corruption of the Swiss church --
IV. Zwingle's birth and school-days --
V. Zwingle's progress towards emancipation --
VI. Zwingle in presence of the Bible --
VII. Einsiedeln and Zurich --
VIII. THe pardon-monger and the plague --
IX. Extension of the reformation to Bern and other Swiss towns --
X. Spread of Protestantism in Eastern Switzerland --
XI. The question of forbidden meats --
XII. Public disputation at Zurich --
XIII. Dissolution of conventual and monastic establishments --
XIV. Discussion on image and the mass --
XV. Establishment of Protestantism in Zurich --
Book ninth: history of Protestantism from the Diet of Womrs, 1521, to the Augsburg confession, 1530 --
I. The German New Testament --
II. The abolition of the mass --
III. Pope Adrian and his scheme of reform --
IV. Pope Clement and the Nuremburg Diet --
V. Nuremburg --
VI. The Ratisbon league and reformation --
VII. Luther's views on the sacrament and image-worship --
VIII. War of the peasants --
IX. The battle of Pavia and its influence on Protestantism --
X. Diet of Spires, 1526, and leagues against the emperor --
XI. The sack of Rome --
XII. Organization of the Lutheran church --
XIII. Constitution of the church of Hesse --
XIV. Politics and prodigies --
XV. The great protest --
XVI. Conference at Marburg --
XVII. The Marburg confession --
XVIII. The emperor, the Turk, and the reformation --
XIX. Meeting between the emperor and Pope at Bologna --
XX. Preparations for the Augsburg Diet --
XXI. Arrival of the emperor at Augsburg and opening of the Diet --
XXII. Luther in the Coburg, and Melancthon at the Diet --
XXIII. Reading of the Augsburg confession --
XXIV. After the Diet of Augsburg --
XXV. Attempted refutation of the confession --
XXVI. End of the Diet of Augsburg --
XXVII. A retrospect --
1517-1530 --
progress. V.2 Book tenth: rise and establishment of Protestantism in Sweden and Denmark --
I. Causes that influenced the reception of rejection of Protestantism in the various countries --
II .Fortunes of Protestantism south of the Alps --
III. Introduction of Protestantism into Sweden --
IV. Conference at Upsala --
V. Establishment of Protestantism in Sweden --
VI. Protestantism in Sweden, from Vasa (1530) to Charles IX (1604) --
VII. Introduction of Protestantism into Denmark --
VIII. Church-song in Denmark --
IX. Establishment of Protestantism in Denmark --
X. Protestantism under Christian III, and its extension to Norway and Iceland --
Book eleventh: Protestantism in Switzerland from its establishment in Zurich (1525) to the death of Zwingle (1531) --
I. Zwingle --
his doctrine of the Lord's supper --
II. Disputation at Baden and its results --
III. Outbreak and suppression of Anabaptism in Switzerland --
IV. Establishment of Protestantism at Bern --
V. Reformation consummated in Basil --
VI. League of the five cantons with Austria --
Switzerland divided --
VII. Arms --
negotiations --
peace --
VIII. Proposed Christian republic for defense of civil rights --
IX. Gathering of a second storm --
X. Death of Zwingle --
Book twelfth: Protestantism in Germany from the Augsburg confession to the peace of Passau --
I. The Schmalkald league --
II. The German Anabaptists, or the "heavenly kingdom" --
III. Accession of princes and state to Protestantism --
IV. Death and burial of Luther --
V. The Schmalkald war, and defeat of the protestants --
VI. The "interim" --
reestablishment of Protestantism --
Book thirteenth: from rise of protestantsim in France (1510) to publication of the "institutes" (1536) --
I. The doctor of Etaples, the first protestant teacher in France --
II. Farel, Briconnet, and the early reformers of France --
III. The first protestant congregation of France --
IV. Commencement of persecution in France --
V. The first martyrs of France --
VI. Calvin: his birth and education --
VII. Calvin's conversion --
VIII. Calvin becomes a student of law --
IX. Calvin the evangelist, and Berquin the martyr --
X. Calvin at Paris, and Francis negotiating with Germany and England --
XI. The gospel preached in Paris --
a martyr --
XII. Calvin's flight from Paris --
XIII. First protestant administration of the Lord's supper in France --
XIV. Catherine de Medici --
XV. Marriage of Henry of France to Catherine de Medici --
XVI. Melancthon's plan for uniting Wittemberg and Rome --
XVIII. Plan of Francis I for combining Lutheranism and Romanism --
XIX. The night of the placards --
XX. Martyrs and exiles --
XXI. Other and more dreadful martyrdoms --
XXII. Basle and the "institutes" --
XXIV. Calvin on predestination and election --
XXV. Calvin's appeal to Francis I --
Book Fourteenth: rise and establishment of the Protestantism at Geneva --
I. Geneva: the city and its history --
II. Genevese martyrs of liberty --
III. The reform commenced in Lausanne, and established in Morat and Neuchatel --
IV. Tumults --
successes --
toleration --
V. Farel enters Geneva --
VI. Geneva on the brink of civil war --
VII. Heroism of Geneva --
VIII. Rome falls and Geneva rises --
IX. Establishment of Protestantism in Geneva V.2 cont. X. Calvin enters Geneva --
its civil and ecclesiastical constitution --
XI. Sumptuary laws -Calvin and Farel banished --
XII. Calvin at Strasburg --
Rome draws near to Geneva --
XIII. Abortive conferences at Hagenau and Ratisbon --
XIV. Calvin returns to Geneva --
XV. The ecclesiastical ordinances --
XVI. The new Geneva --
XVII. Calvin's battles with the Libertines --
XVIII. Calvin's labors for union --
XIX. Servetus comes to Geneva and is arrested --
XX. Calvin's victory over the Libertines --
XXI. Apprehension and trial of Servetus --
XXII. Condemnation and death of Servetus --
XXIII. Calvin's correspondence with martyrs, reformers, and monarchs --
XXIV. Calvin's manifold labors --
XXV. Final victory and glory of Geneva --
XXVI. Geneva and its influence in Europe --
XXVII. The academy of Geneva --
XXVIII. The social and family life of Geneva --
XXIX. Calvin's last illness and death --
XXX. Calvin's work --
Book fifteenth: The Jesuits --
I. Ignatius Loyola --
II. Loyola's first disciples --
III. Organizations and training of the Jesuits --
IV. Moral code of the Jesuits --
Probabilism, &c. --
V. The Jesuit teaching on regicide, murder, lying, theft, &c. --
VI. The "secret instructions" of the Jesuits --
VII. Jesuit management of rich widows and the heirs of great families --
VIII. Diffusion of the Jesuits throughout Christendom --
IX. Commercial enterprises and banishments --
X. Restoration of the inquisition --
XI. The tortures of the inquisition --
Book sixteenth: Protestantism in the Waldensian valleys --
I. Antiquity and first persecutions of the Waldenses --
II. Cataneo's expedition (1488) against the Dauphinese and Piedmontese confessors --
III. Failure of Cateneo's expedition --
IV. Synod in the Waldensian valleys --
V. Persecutions and martyrdoms --
VI. Preparations for a war of extermination --
VII. The great campaign of 1561 --
VIII. Waldensian colonies in Calabria and Apulia --
IX. Extinction of Waldenses in Calabria --
X. The year of the plague --
XI. The great massacre --
XII. Exploits of Gianavello --
massacre and pillage of Rora --
XIII. The exile --
XIV. Return to the valleys --
XV. Final reestablishment in their valleys --
XVI. Condition of the Waldenses from 1690 --
Book seventeenth: Protestantism in France from death of Frances I (1547) to edict of Nantes (1598) --
I. Henry II and parties in France --
II. Henry II and his persecutions --
III. First national synod of the French protestant church --
IV. A gallery of portraits --
V. The Guises, and the insurrection of Amboise --
VI. Charles IX --
the triumvirate --
colloquy at Poissy --
VII .Massacre at Vassy and commencement of the civil wars --
IX. The first Huguenot war, and death of the duke of Guise --
X. Catherine de Medici and her son, Charles IX --
conference of Bayonne --
the St. Bartholomew plotted --
XI. Second and third Huguenot wars --
XII. Synod of La Rochelle --
XIII. The promoters of the St. Bartholomew massacre --
XIV. Negotiations of the court with the Huguenots --
XV. The marriage, and preparations for the massacre --
XVI. The massacre of St. Bartholomew --
XVII. Resurrection of Huguenotism --
death of Charles IX --
XVIII. New persecutions --
reign and death of Henry III --
XIX. V. 3 Book eighteenth: history of Protestantism in the Netherlands --
I. The Netherlands and their inhabitants --
II. Introduction of Protestantism into the Netherlands --
III. Antwerp: its confessors and martyrs --
IV. Abdication of Charles V., and accession of Philip II --
V. Philip arranges the government of the Netherlands, and departs for Spain --
VI. Storms in the council, and martyrs at the stake --
VII. Retirement of Granvelle --
Belgic confession of faith --
VIII. The rising storm --
IX. The confederates or "beggars" --
X. The field-preachings --
XI. The image-breakings --
XII. Reaction --
submission of the southern Netherlands --
XIII. The council of blood --
XIV. William unfurls his standard --
execution of Egmont and Horn --
XV. Failure of William's first campaign --
XVI. The "beggars of the sea," and second campaign of the prince of Orange --
XVII. William's second campaign, and submission of Brabant and Flanders --
XVIII. The siege of Haarlem --
XIX. Siege of Alkmaar, and recall of Alva --
XX. Third campaign of William, and death of count Louis of Nassau --
XXI. The siege of Leyden --
XXII. March of the Spanish army through the sea --
sack of Antwerp --
XXIII. The "Pacification of Ghent," and toleration --
XXIV. Administration of Don John, and first Synod of Dort --
XXV. Abjuration of Philip, and rise of the seven united provinces --
XXIX. The Synod of Dort --
XXX. Grandeur of the united provinces --
Book nineteenth: Protestantism in Poland and Bohemia --
I. Rise and spread of Protestantism in Poland --
II. John Alasco, and reformation of east Friesland --
III. Acme of Protestantism in Poland --
IV. Organization of the protestant church of Poland --
V. Turning of the tide of Protestantism in Poland --
VI. The Jesuits enter Poland --
destruction of its Protestantism --
VII. Bohemia --
entrance of reformation --
VIII. Overthrow of Protestantism in Bohemia --
IX. An army of martyrs --
X. Suppression of Protestantism in Bohemia --
Book twentieth: Protestantism in Hungary and Transylvania --
I. Planting of Protestantism --
II. Protestantism flourishes in Hungary and Transylvania --
III. Ferdinand II and the era of persecution --
IV. Leopold I and the Jesuits --
V. Banishment of pastors and desolation of the church of Hungary --
Book twenty-first: the thirty years' war --
I. Great periods of the thirty years' war --
II. The army and the camp --
III. The march and its devastations --
IV. Conquest of north Germany by Ferdinand II and the "Catholic league" --
V. Edict of restitution --
VI. Arrival of Gustavus Adolphus in Germany --
VII. Fall of Magdeburg and victory of Leipzig --
VIII. Conquest of the Rhine and Bavaria --
battle of Lützen --
IX. Death of Gustavus Adolphus --
X. The pacification of Westphalia --
XI. The fatherland after the war --
Book twenty-second: Protestantism in France from death of Henry IV (1610) to the revolution (1789) I. Louis XIII and the wars of religion --
II. Fall of la Rochelle, and end of the wars of religion --
III. Industrial and literary eminence of the French protestants --
IV. The Dragonnades --
V. Revocation of the edict of Nantes --
VI. The prisons and the galleys --
VII. The "church of the desert" --
Book twenty-third: Protestantism in England from the times of Henry VIII --
I. The king and the scholars --
II. Cardinal Wolsey and the New Testament of Erasmus --
III. William Tyndale and the English New Testament --
IV. Tyndale's New Testament arrives in England --
V. The Bible and the cellar at Oxford --
Anne Boleyn --
VI. The divorce --
Thomas Bilney, the martyr --
VII. The divorce, and Wolsey's fall --
VIII. Cranmer --
Cromwell --
the papal supremacy abolished --
IX. The king declared head of the church of England V. 3 cont. X. Scaffolds --
death of Henry VIII --
XI. The church of England as reformed by Cranmer --
XII. Deaths of protector summer Somerset and Edward VI --
XIII. Restoration of the pope's authority in England --
XIV. The burnings under Mary --
XV. Elizabeth --
restoration of the protestant church --
XVI. Excommunication of Elizabeth, and plots of the Jesuits --
XVII. The armada --
its building --
XVIII. The armada arrives off England --
XIX. Destruction of the armada --
XX. Greatness of protestant England --
Book twenty-fourth: Protestantism in Scotland --
I. The darkness and the daybreak --
II. Scotland's first preacher and martyr, Patrick Hamilton --
III. Wishart is burned, and Knox comes forward --
IV. Knox's call to the ministry and first sermon --
V. Knox's final return to Scotland --
VI. Establishment of the reformation in Scotland --
VII. Constitution of the "Kirk" --
arrival of Mary Stuart --
VIII. Knox's interview with queen Mary --
IX. Trial of Knox for treason --
X. The last days of queen Mary and John Knox --
XI. Andrew Melville --
the Tulchan bishops --
XII. Battles for Presbyterianism and liberty --
XIII. James VI in England --
the gunpowder plot --
XIV. Death of James IV, and spiritual awakening in Scotland --
XV. Charles I and archbishop Laud --
religious innovations --
XVI. The national covenant and assembly of 1638 --
XVII. Civil war --
solemn league --
Westminster assembly --
XVIII. Parliament triumphs, and the king is beheaded --
XIX. Restoration of Charles II, and St. Bartholomew day, 1662 --
XX. Scotland --
XXI. Establishment of prelacy in Scotland --
XXII. Four hundred ministers ejected --
XXIII. Breach of the "triple league" and war with Holland --
XXIV. The popish plot, and death of Charles II --
XXV. The first rising of the Scottish Presbyterians --
XXVI. The field-preaching or "conventicle" --
XXVII. Drumclog --
Bothwell ridge --
the "killing times" --
XXVIII. James II --
projects to restore popery --
XXIX. A great crisis in England and Christendom --
XXX. Protestantism mounts
Responsibility: by J.A. Wylie.

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Primary Entity

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    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1079920> ; # Protestantism
    schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1092555> ; # Reformation
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    schema:description "V.1 cont. V. Trial and condemnation of sir John Oldcastle (Lord Cobham) -- VI. Lollardism denounced as treason -- VII. Martyrdom of Lord Cobham -- VIII. Lollardism under Henry V and Henry VI -- IX. Rome's attempt to regain dominancy in England -- X. Resistance to papal encroachments -- XI. Influence of the wars of the fifteenth century on the progress of Protestantism -- Book eighth: history of Protestantism in Switzerland from A.D. 1516 to its establishment at Zurich, 1525 -- I. Switzerland -- the country and the people -- II. Condition of Switzerland prior to the reformation -- III. Corruption of the Swiss church -- IV. Zwingle's birth and school-days -- V. Zwingle's progress towards emancipation -- VI. Zwingle in presence of the Bible -- VII. Einsiedeln and Zurich -- VIII. THe pardon-monger and the plague -- IX. Extension of the reformation to Bern and other Swiss towns -- X. Spread of Protestantism in Eastern Switzerland -- XI. The question of forbidden meats -- XII. Public disputation at Zurich -- XIII. Dissolution of conventual and monastic establishments -- XIV. Discussion on image and the mass -- XV. Establishment of Protestantism in Zurich -- Book ninth: history of Protestantism from the Diet of Womrs, 1521, to the Augsburg confession, 1530 -- I. The German New Testament -- II. The abolition of the mass -- III. Pope Adrian and his scheme of reform -- IV. Pope Clement and the Nuremburg Diet -- V. Nuremburg -- VI. The Ratisbon league and reformation -- VII. Luther's views on the sacrament and image-worship -- VIII. War of the peasants -- IX. The battle of Pavia and its influence on Protestantism -- X. Diet of Spires, 1526, and leagues against the emperor -- XI. The sack of Rome -- XII. Organization of the Lutheran church -- XIII. Constitution of the church of Hesse -- XIV. Politics and prodigies -- XV. The great protest -- XVI. Conference at Marburg -- XVII. The Marburg confession -- XVIII. The emperor, the Turk, and the reformation -- XIX. Meeting between the emperor and Pope at Bologna -- XX. Preparations for the Augsburg Diet -- XXI. Arrival of the emperor at Augsburg and opening of the Diet -- XXII. Luther in the Coburg, and Melancthon at the Diet -- XXIII. Reading of the Augsburg confession -- XXIV. After the Diet of Augsburg -- XXV. Attempted refutation of the confession -- XXVI. End of the Diet of Augsburg -- XXVII. A retrospect -- 1517-1530 -- progress."@en ;
    schema:description "V. 1 Book first: progress from the first to the fourteenth century -- I. Protestantism -- II. Declension of the early Christian church -- III. Development of the papacy from the times of Constantine to those of Hildebrand -- IV. Development of the papacy from Gregory VII to Boniface VIII -- V. Mediaeval protestant witnesses -- VI. The Waldenses -- their valleys -- VII. The Waldenses -- their missions and martyrdoms -- VIII. The Paulicians -- IX. Crusades against the Albigenses -- X. Erection of tribunal of inquisition -- XI. Protestants before Protestantism -- XII. Abelard, and rise of modern skepticism -- Book second: Wicliffe and his times, or advent of Protestantism -- I. Wicliffe: his birth and education -- II. Wicliffe, and the pope's encroachments on England -- III. Wicliffe's battle with Rome for England's independence -- IV. Wicliffe's battle with the mendicant friars -- V. The friars versus the gospel in England -- VI. The battle of the parliament with the pope -- VII. Persecution of Wicliffe by the pope and the hierarchy -- VIII. Hierarchical persecution of Wicliffe resumed -- IX. Wicliffe's views on church property and church reform -- X. The translation of the scriptures, or the English Bible -- XI. Wicliffe and transubstantiation -- XII. Wicliffe's appeal to parliament -- XIII. Wicliffe before convocation in person, and before the Roman Curia by letter -- XIV. Wicliffe's last days -- XV. Wicliffe's theological and church system -- Book third: John Huss and the Hussite wars -- I. Birth, education, and first labors of Huss -- II. Huss begins his warfare against Rome -- III. Growing opposition of Huss to Rome -- IV. preparations for the council of Constance -- V. Deposition of the rival popes -- VI. Imprisonment and examination of Huss -- VII. Condemnation and martyrdom of Huss -- VIII. Wicliffe and Huss compares in their theology, their character, and their labors -- IX. Trials and temptation of Jerome -- X. The trial of Jerome -- XI. Condemnation and burning of Jerome -- XII. Wicliffe, Huss, and Jerome, or the three first witnesses of modern Christendom -- XIII. The Hussite wars -- XIV. Commencement of the Hussite wars -- XV. Marvellous genius of Ziska as a general -- XVI. Second crusade against Bohemia -- XVII. Brilliant successes of the Hussites -- XVIII. The council of Basle -- XIX. Last scenes of the Bohemian reformation -- Book fourth: Christendom at the opening of the sixteenth century -- I. Protestantism and medievalism -- II. The empire -- III. The papacy, or Christendom under the tiara -- Book fifth: history of Protestantism in Germany to the Leipzig disputation, 1519 -- I. Luther's birth, childhood, and school-days -- II. Luther's college-life -- III. Luther's life in the convent -- IV. Luther the monk becomes Luther the reformer -- V. Luther as priest, professor, and preacher -- VI. Luther's journey to Rome -- VII. Luther in Rome -- VIII. Tetzel preaches indulgences -- IX. The "theses" -- X. Luther attacked by Tetzel, Prierio, and Eck -- XI. Luther's journey to Augsburg -- XII. Luther's appearance before cardinal Cajetan -- XIII. Luther's return to Wittemberg and labors there -- XIV. Miltitz -- Carlstadt -- Dr. Eck -- XV. The Leipzig disputation -- Book sixth: from the Leipzig disputation to the Diet at Woms, 1521 -- I. Protestantism and imperialism; or, the monk and the monarch -- II. Pope Leo's bull -- III. Interviews and negotiations -- IV. Luther summoned to the Diet at Worms -- V. Luther's journey and arrival at Worms -- VI. Luther before the Diet at Worms -- VII. Luther put under the ban of the empire -- Book seventh: Protestantism in England from the times of Wicliffe to those of Henry VIII -- I. The first protestant martyrs in England -- II. The theology of the early English church protestants -- III. Growth of English Protestantism -- IV. Efforts for the redistribution of ecclesiastical property"@en ;
    schema:description "V.2 Book tenth: rise and establishment of Protestantism in Sweden and Denmark -- I. Causes that influenced the reception of rejection of Protestantism in the various countries -- II .Fortunes of Protestantism south of the Alps -- III. Introduction of Protestantism into Sweden -- IV. Conference at Upsala -- V. Establishment of Protestantism in Sweden -- VI. Protestantism in Sweden, from Vasa (1530) to Charles IX (1604) -- VII. Introduction of Protestantism into Denmark -- VIII. Church-song in Denmark -- IX. Establishment of Protestantism in Denmark -- X. Protestantism under Christian III, and its extension to Norway and Iceland -- Book eleventh: Protestantism in Switzerland from its establishment in Zurich (1525) to the death of Zwingle (1531) -- I. Zwingle -- his doctrine of the Lord's supper -- II. Disputation at Baden and its results -- III. Outbreak and suppression of Anabaptism in Switzerland -- IV. Establishment of Protestantism at Bern -- V. Reformation consummated in Basil -- VI. League of the five cantons with Austria -- Switzerland divided -- VII. Arms -- negotiations -- peace -- VIII. Proposed Christian republic for defense of civil rights -- IX. Gathering of a second storm -- X. Death of Zwingle -- Book twelfth: Protestantism in Germany from the Augsburg confession to the peace of Passau -- I. The Schmalkald league -- II. The German Anabaptists, or the "heavenly kingdom" -- III. Accession of princes and state to Protestantism -- IV. Death and burial of Luther -- V. The Schmalkald war, and defeat of the protestants -- VI. The "interim" -- reestablishment of Protestantism -- Book thirteenth: from rise of protestantsim in France (1510) to publication of the "institutes" (1536) -- I. The doctor of Etaples, the first protestant teacher in France -- II. Farel, Briconnet, and the early reformers of France -- III. The first protestant congregation of France -- IV. Commencement of persecution in France -- V. The first martyrs of France -- VI. Calvin: his birth and education -- VII. Calvin's conversion -- VIII. Calvin becomes a student of law -- IX. Calvin the evangelist, and Berquin the martyr -- X. Calvin at Paris, and Francis negotiating with Germany and England -- XI. The gospel preached in Paris -- a martyr -- XII. Calvin's flight from Paris -- XIII. First protestant administration of the Lord's supper in France -- XIV. Catherine de Medici -- XV. Marriage of Henry of France to Catherine de Medici -- XVI. Melancthon's plan for uniting Wittemberg and Rome -- XVIII. Plan of Francis I for combining Lutheranism and Romanism -- XIX. The night of the placards -- XX. Martyrs and exiles -- XXI. Other and more dreadful martyrdoms -- XXII. Basle and the "institutes" -- XXIV. Calvin on predestination and election -- XXV. Calvin's appeal to Francis I -- Book Fourteenth: rise and establishment of the Protestantism at Geneva -- I. Geneva: the city and its history -- II. Genevese martyrs of liberty -- III. The reform commenced in Lausanne, and established in Morat and Neuchatel -- IV. Tumults -- successes -- toleration -- V. Farel enters Geneva -- VI. Geneva on the brink of civil war -- VII. Heroism of Geneva -- VIII. Rome falls and Geneva rises -- IX. Establishment of Protestantism in Geneva"@en ;
    schema:description "V. 3 Book eighteenth: history of Protestantism in the Netherlands -- I. The Netherlands and their inhabitants -- II. Introduction of Protestantism into the Netherlands -- III. Antwerp: its confessors and martyrs -- IV. Abdication of Charles V., and accession of Philip II -- V. Philip arranges the government of the Netherlands, and departs for Spain -- VI. Storms in the council, and martyrs at the stake -- VII. Retirement of Granvelle -- Belgic confession of faith -- VIII. The rising storm -- IX. The confederates or "beggars" -- X. The field-preachings -- XI. The image-breakings -- XII. Reaction -- submission of the southern Netherlands -- XIII. The council of blood -- XIV. William unfurls his standard -- execution of Egmont and Horn -- XV. Failure of William's first campaign -- XVI. The "beggars of the sea," and second campaign of the prince of Orange -- XVII. William's second campaign, and submission of Brabant and Flanders -- XVIII. The siege of Haarlem -- XIX. Siege of Alkmaar, and recall of Alva -- XX. Third campaign of William, and death of count Louis of Nassau -- XXI. The siege of Leyden -- XXII. March of the Spanish army through the sea -- sack of Antwerp -- XXIII. The "Pacification of Ghent," and toleration -- XXIV. Administration of Don John, and first Synod of Dort -- XXV. Abjuration of Philip, and rise of the seven united provinces -- XXIX. The Synod of Dort -- XXX. Grandeur of the united provinces -- Book nineteenth: Protestantism in Poland and Bohemia -- I. Rise and spread of Protestantism in Poland -- II. John Alasco, and reformation of east Friesland -- III. Acme of Protestantism in Poland -- IV. Organization of the protestant church of Poland -- V. Turning of the tide of Protestantism in Poland -- VI. The Jesuits enter Poland -- destruction of its Protestantism -- VII. Bohemia -- entrance of reformation -- VIII. Overthrow of Protestantism in Bohemia -- IX. An army of martyrs -- X. Suppression of Protestantism in Bohemia -- Book twentieth: Protestantism in Hungary and Transylvania -- I. Planting of Protestantism -- II. Protestantism flourishes in Hungary and Transylvania -- III. Ferdinand II and the era of persecution -- IV. Leopold I and the Jesuits -- V. Banishment of pastors and desolation of the church of Hungary -- Book twenty-first: the thirty years' war -- I. Great periods of the thirty years' war -- II. The army and the camp -- III. The march and its devastations -- IV. Conquest of north Germany by Ferdinand II and the "Catholic league" -- V. Edict of restitution -- VI. Arrival of Gustavus Adolphus in Germany -- VII. Fall of Magdeburg and victory of Leipzig -- VIII. Conquest of the Rhine and Bavaria -- battle of Lützen -- IX. Death of Gustavus Adolphus -- X. The pacification of Westphalia -- XI. The fatherland after the war -- Book twenty-second: Protestantism in France from death of Henry IV (1610) to the revolution (1789) I. Louis XIII and the wars of religion -- II. Fall of la Rochelle, and end of the wars of religion -- III. Industrial and literary eminence of the French protestants -- IV. The Dragonnades -- V. Revocation of the edict of Nantes -- VI. The prisons and the galleys -- VII. The "church of the desert" -- Book twenty-third: Protestantism in England from the times of Henry VIII -- I. The king and the scholars -- II. Cardinal Wolsey and the New Testament of Erasmus -- III. William Tyndale and the English New Testament -- IV. Tyndale's New Testament arrives in England -- V. The Bible and the cellar at Oxford -- Anne Boleyn -- VI. The divorce -- Thomas Bilney, the martyr -- VII. The divorce, and Wolsey's fall -- VIII. Cranmer -- Cromwell -- the papal supremacy abolished -- IX. The king declared head of the church of England"@en ;
    schema:description "V. 3 cont. X. Scaffolds -- death of Henry VIII -- XI. The church of England as reformed by Cranmer -- XII. Deaths of protector summer Somerset and Edward VI -- XIII. Restoration of the pope's authority in England -- XIV. The burnings under Mary -- XV. Elizabeth -- restoration of the protestant church -- XVI. Excommunication of Elizabeth, and plots of the Jesuits -- XVII. The armada -- its building -- XVIII. The armada arrives off England -- XIX. Destruction of the armada -- XX. Greatness of protestant England -- Book twenty-fourth: Protestantism in Scotland -- I. The darkness and the daybreak -- II. Scotland's first preacher and martyr, Patrick Hamilton -- III. Wishart is burned, and Knox comes forward -- IV. Knox's call to the ministry and first sermon -- V. Knox's final return to Scotland -- VI. Establishment of the reformation in Scotland -- VII. Constitution of the "Kirk" -- arrival of Mary Stuart -- VIII. Knox's interview with queen Mary -- IX. Trial of Knox for treason -- X. The last days of queen Mary and John Knox -- XI. Andrew Melville -- the Tulchan bishops -- XII. Battles for Presbyterianism and liberty -- XIII. James VI in England -- the gunpowder plot -- XIV. Death of James IV, and spiritual awakening in Scotland -- XV. Charles I and archbishop Laud -- religious innovations -- XVI. The national covenant and assembly of 1638 -- XVII. Civil war -- solemn league -- Westminster assembly -- XVIII. Parliament triumphs, and the king is beheaded -- XIX. Restoration of Charles II, and St. Bartholomew day, 1662 -- XX. Scotland -- XXI. Establishment of prelacy in Scotland -- XXII. Four hundred ministers ejected -- XXIII. Breach of the "triple league" and war with Holland -- XXIV. The popish plot, and death of Charles II -- XXV. The first rising of the Scottish Presbyterians -- XXVI. The field-preaching or "conventicle" -- XXVII. Drumclog -- Bothwell ridge -- the "killing times" -- XXVIII. James II -- projects to restore popery -- XXIX. A great crisis in England and Christendom -- XXX. Protestantism mounts"@en ;
    schema:description "V.2 cont. X. Calvin enters Geneva -- its civil and ecclesiastical constitution -- XI. Sumptuary laws -Calvin and Farel banished -- XII. Calvin at Strasburg -- Rome draws near to Geneva -- XIII. Abortive conferences at Hagenau and Ratisbon -- XIV. Calvin returns to Geneva -- XV. The ecclesiastical ordinances -- XVI. The new Geneva -- XVII. Calvin's battles with the Libertines -- XVIII. Calvin's labors for union -- XIX. Servetus comes to Geneva and is arrested -- XX. Calvin's victory over the Libertines -- XXI. Apprehension and trial of Servetus -- XXII. Condemnation and death of Servetus -- XXIII. Calvin's correspondence with martyrs, reformers, and monarchs -- XXIV. Calvin's manifold labors -- XXV. Final victory and glory of Geneva -- XXVI. Geneva and its influence in Europe -- XXVII. The academy of Geneva -- XXVIII. The social and family life of Geneva -- XXIX. Calvin's last illness and death -- XXX. Calvin's work -- Book fifteenth: The Jesuits -- I. Ignatius Loyola -- II. Loyola's first disciples -- III. Organizations and training of the Jesuits -- IV. Moral code of the Jesuits -- Probabilism, &c. -- V. The Jesuit teaching on regicide, murder, lying, theft, &c. -- VI. The "secret instructions" of the Jesuits -- VII. Jesuit management of rich widows and the heirs of great families -- VIII. Diffusion of the Jesuits throughout Christendom -- IX. Commercial enterprises and banishments -- X. Restoration of the inquisition -- XI. The tortures of the inquisition -- Book sixteenth: Protestantism in the Waldensian valleys -- I. Antiquity and first persecutions of the Waldenses -- II. Cataneo's expedition (1488) against the Dauphinese and Piedmontese confessors -- III. Failure of Cateneo's expedition -- IV. Synod in the Waldensian valleys -- V. Persecutions and martyrdoms -- VI. Preparations for a war of extermination -- VII. The great campaign of 1561 -- VIII. Waldensian colonies in Calabria and Apulia -- IX. Extinction of Waldenses in Calabria -- X. The year of the plague -- XI. The great massacre -- XII. Exploits of Gianavello -- massacre and pillage of Rora -- XIII. The exile -- XIV. Return to the valleys -- XV. Final reestablishment in their valleys -- XVI. Condition of the Waldenses from 1690 -- Book seventeenth: Protestantism in France from death of Frances I (1547) to edict of Nantes (1598) -- I. Henry II and parties in France -- II. Henry II and his persecutions -- III. First national synod of the French protestant church -- IV. A gallery of portraits -- V. The Guises, and the insurrection of Amboise -- VI. Charles IX -- the triumvirate -- colloquy at Poissy -- VII .Massacre at Vassy and commencement of the civil wars -- IX. The first Huguenot war, and death of the duke of Guise -- X. Catherine de Medici and her son, Charles IX -- conference of Bayonne -- the St. Bartholomew plotted -- XI. Second and third Huguenot wars -- XII. Synod of La Rochelle -- XIII. The promoters of the St. Bartholomew massacre -- XIV. Negotiations of the court with the Huguenots -- XV. The marriage, and preparations for the massacre -- XVI. The massacre of St. Bartholomew -- XVII. Resurrection of Huguenotism -- death of Charles IX -- XVIII. New persecutions -- reign and death of Henry III -- XIX."@en ;
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