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Hitler's table talk, 1941-1944 : his private conversations

Author: Adolf Hitler; Norman Cameron; R H Stevens; H R Trevor-Roper
Publisher: New York City : Enigma Books, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 3rd edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Hitler's Table Talk 1941-1944 records the private, off the record, informal conversations of a man, who, more than anyone else, came close to destroying the western world." "Here is an account of Hitler freely talking about his enemies, his friends, his ambitions, his failures, his secret dreams - voicing his thoughts to his intimate associates as the sun set at the end of each day of the war. We see here a
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Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Adolf Hitler; Norman Cameron; R H Stevens; H R Trevor-Roper
ISBN: 1929631057 9781929631056
OCLC Number: 44848323
Language Note: Translation of the Bormann-Vermerke.
Notes: American ed. published under title: Secret conversations, 1941-1944.
Description: xxxix, 746 pages ; 24 cm
Other Titles: Secret conversations, 1941-1944
Responsibility: translated by Norman Cameron and R.H. Stevens ; introduced and with a new preface by H.R. Trevor-Roper.

Abstract:

"Hitler's Table Talk 1941-1944 records the private, off the record, informal conversations of a man, who, more than anyone else, came close to destroying the western world." "Here is an account of Hitler freely talking about his enemies, his friends, his ambitions, his failures, his secret dreams - voicing his thoughts to his intimate associates as the sun set at the end of each day of the war. We see here a conversational Hitler letting down his guard to his trusted henchmen. Miraculously, Martin Bormann persuaded Hitler to let these talks be taken down by a team of specially picked shorthand writers. Hitler had intended, after his infamous tyranny, to use these notes as source material for the books he planned to write about the glory of the "Thousand-Year Reich.""

"Der Fuhrer's mind was crude and narrow; he had little education and, as we see here, no humanity; but we can also see that he was (as he himself knew) a political genius, a "terrible simplifier," a man who, with no equipment except his own will power, personality and ideas, attempted to bring mankind into a terrible darkness."--Jacket.

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