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Home is where the wind blows : chapters from a cosmologist's life

Author: Fred Hoyle
Publisher: Mill Valley, Calif. : University Science Books, ©1994.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In Home Is Where the Wind Blows, Sir Fred Hoyle, one of this century's most eminent scientists and author of dozens of successful books, both fiction and nonfiction, offers a revealing and charming account of his life and work. Mathematician, physicist, astronomer, cosmologist - Sir Fred is perhaps best known, in scientific circles, for his brilliant explanation of the origin of the elements from hydrogen nuclei in
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Genre/Form: Biography
History
Named Person: Fred Hoyle; Fred Hoyle; Fred Hoyle; Fred Hoyle
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Fred Hoyle
ISBN: 093570227X 9780935702279
OCLC Number: 29669217
Description: xi, 443 p., [24] p. of plates : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: pt. I. 34, Primrose Lane: 1915-1939. ch. 1. The first World War --
ch. 2. Forgotten times --
ch. 3. Coming to grips with who you are --
ch. 4. Creeping like snail more slowly than Shakespeare --
ch. 5. A scholarship won from the grip of fate --
ch. 6. Education at last, and a scholarship lost to the grip of fate --
ch. 7. First journeys to Cambridge --
ch. 8. Then the undergraduate seeking a bubble reputation in the cannon's mouth --
ch. 9. Dark clouds across the sun --
ch. 10. The last of the old world --
pt. II. The larger world of science: 1939-1958. ch. 11. Sir Arthur Eddington --
ch. 12. At war with Germany --
ch. 13. The Nutbourne saga --
ch. 14. The saga continues --
ch. 15. The aftermath --
ch. 16. The origin of the chemical elements --
ch. 17 Brave new world --
ch. 18. An unknown level in carbon-12 --
ch. 19. Steps to the watershed --
ch. 20. The watershed --
pt. III. Home is where the wind blows: 1959- . ch. 21. A vintage year --
ch. 22. Droll stories --
ch. 23. The Munros of Scotland --
ch. 24. The Institute of Astronomy, but still in slow stages --
ch. 25. The thirty-ninth step --
ch. 26. The Bay of the Birds --
ch. 27. Climbing the last Munro --
ch. 28. A lucky ending.
Responsibility: Fred Hoyle.

Abstract:

In Home Is Where the Wind Blows, Sir Fred Hoyle, one of this century's most eminent scientists and author of dozens of successful books, both fiction and nonfiction, offers a revealing and charming account of his life and work. Mathematician, physicist, astronomer, cosmologist - Sir Fred is perhaps best known, in scientific circles, for his brilliant explanation of the origin of the elements from hydrogen nuclei in stars (a process known as nucleosynthesis) and for developing (with Sir Hermann Bondi and Thomas Gold) the elegant but controversial steady-state theory of the Universe (which assumes the continuous creation of matter). In 1950, in the last of a series of radio lectures on astronomy that he delivered on the air for the BBC, Sir Fred coined the term "Big Bang" to characterize the competing expanding-Universe theory, which has since become the dominant paradigm. Ironically, the term has become a permanent addition to the language of cosmology.

Sir Fred's name has become well known to the general public because of his unusual ability to describe the ideas of science in a simple and accessible way. In addition to his scientific work, he has written more than a dozen works of popular science (many of them widely translated) and more than a dozen works of science fiction (most of them in collaboration with his son, Geoffrey). In all his work, Sir Fred has shown himself to be ready and able to challenge established thinking. In the author's amusing and memorable account of his childhood in Home Is Where the Wind Blows, the reader will see how this came to be true. Possessed since infancy with a strong streak of independence, he was encouraged by his parents, throughout his school years, to trust his own judgment and to think for himself.

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Linked Data


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schema:description"pt. I. 34, Primrose Lane: 1915-1939. ch. 1. The first World War -- ch. 2. Forgotten times -- ch. 3. Coming to grips with who you are -- ch. 4. Creeping like snail more slowly than Shakespeare -- ch. 5. A scholarship won from the grip of fate -- ch. 6. Education at last, and a scholarship lost to the grip of fate -- ch. 7. First journeys to Cambridge -- ch. 8. Then the undergraduate seeking a bubble reputation in the cannon's mouth -- ch. 9. Dark clouds across the sun -- ch. 10. The last of the old world -- pt. II. The larger world of science: 1939-1958. ch. 11. Sir Arthur Eddington -- ch. 12. At war with Germany -- ch. 13. The Nutbourne saga -- ch. 14. The saga continues -- ch. 15. The aftermath -- ch. 16. The origin of the chemical elements -- ch. 17 Brave new world -- ch. 18. An unknown level in carbon-12 -- ch. 19. Steps to the watershed -- ch. 20. The watershed -- pt. III. Home is where the wind blows: 1959- . ch. 21. A vintage year -- ch. 22. Droll stories -- ch. 23. The Munros of Scotland -- ch. 24. The Institute of Astronomy, but still in slow stages -- ch. 25. The thirty-ninth step -- ch. 26. The Bay of the Birds -- ch. 27. Climbing the last Munro -- ch. 28. A lucky ending."@en
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