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How art becomes history : essays on art, society, and culture in post-New Deal America

Author: Maurice Berger
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Icon Editions, ©1992.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
These essays on American art and culture explore overlapping social, political, cultural and aesthetic issues of post-New Deal America. The book discusses some of the pioneering developments in art history and cultural studies, from the dissolution of formalism in the late 1960s to the reemergence of Marxism in the 1970s and the infusion of semiotic, feminist, psychoanalytical and racial issues in the 1980s. Also  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Berger, Maurice, 1956-
How art becomes history.
New York, N.Y. : Icon Editions, ©1992
(OCoLC)622966236
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Maurice Berger
ISBN: 0064303853 9780064303859 0064302024 9780064302029
OCLC Number: 23771337
Description: xxiii, 200 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction: How Art Becomes History --
I. FSA: The Illiterate Eye --
II. Of Cold Wars and Curators: The Case of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg --
III. World Fairness --
IV. Broken Bodies, Dead Babies, and Other Weapons of War --
V. Race and Representation --
VI. Black Skin, White Masks: Adrian Piper and the Politics of Viewing --
VII. Culture Stories/American Myths. a. Yvonne Rainer's Privilege. b. Young K.'s Friendly America. c. Barbet Schroeder's Reversal of Fortune --
VIII. Are Art Museums Racist? --
IX. Speaking Out: Some Distance to Go.
Responsibility: Maurice Berger.

Abstract:

An account of how the new art history revises the understanding of American art, society and culture of the past 50 years. The book explores the overlapping social, political, cultural and aesthetic  Read more...

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