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How economics forgot history : the problem of historical specificity in social science

Author: Geoffrey Martin Hodgson
Publisher: New York : Routledge, 2001.
Series: Economics as social theory.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Economics today has been widely criticised as being more concerned with mathematical technique than the understanding and explanation of real world phenomena. However, one hundred years ago, in Europe and America, economics was fused with the study of history and its practitioners emphasised the importance of the understanding of specific institutions." "How Economics Forgot History shows how the German historical  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Geoffrey Martin Hodgson
ISBN: 0415257166 9780415257169 0415257174 9780415257176
OCLC Number: 317802014
Description: xix, 422 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Pt. I. Introduction. 1. The limitations of general theory. 2. The problem of historical specificity --
Pt. II. The nineteenth century: the German historical school and its impact. 3. Karl Marx and the specificity of the capitalist system. 4. The older historical school in Germany. 5. The historical school in the British Isles. 6. The methodological failure of the older historical school. 7. Out of Austria: Carl Menger and the Methodenstreit. 8. Alfred Marshall and the British Methodendiskurs. 9. The responses of the younger historical school in Germany --
Pt. III. The twentieth century: from American institutionalism to the end of history. 10. Thorstein Veblen and the foundations of Institutionalism. 11. Early American institutionalism and the problem of historical specificity. 12. The theoretical manifesto of John Commons. 13. Talcott Parsons and the ascent of ahistorical sociology. 14. Death and counter-revolution at the London School of Economics. 15. John Maynard Keynes and his declaration of a General Theory. 16. The triumph of barren universality. 17. Institution blindness and the end of history --
Pt. IV. The millennium: the second coming of history? 18. Are there universals in social and economic theory? 19. Property, culture, habits and institutions. 20. Exchange and production: property and firms. 21. A note on social formations and levels of abstraction. 22. An evolutionary perspective on the historical problem. 23. Invention is helpless without tradition.
Series Title: Economics as social theory.
Responsibility: Geoffrey M. Hodgson.

Abstract:

Hodgson calls into question the tendency of economic method to explain all economic phenomena using the same catch-all theories. He argues that you need different theories and that historical  Read more...

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'I tremendously enjoyed reading this book. Geoffrey Hodgson ... tells a fascinating tale of how economics and social science more generally became abstract and formalistic sciences with little Read more...

 
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