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How everyone became depressed : the rise and fall of the nervous breakdown

Author: Edward Shorter
Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2013.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this provocative book, Edward Shorter describes how in the 19th century patients with anxiety, fatigue and unable to sleep and obsess about the whole thing were considered "nervous," and when they lost control it was a "nervous breakdown." Then psychiatry turned its back on the whole concept of nerves, and--first under the influence of Freud's psychoanalysis and then the influence of the pharmaceutical  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Edward Shorter
ISBN: 9780199948086 0199948089
OCLC Number: 806430722
Description: x, 256 p. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Nerves as a problem --
The rise of nervous illness --
Fatigue --
Anxiety --
A different kind of nervous breakdown: melancholia --
The nervous breakdown --
Paradigm shift --
Something wrong with the label --
Drugs --
The return of the two depressions (and an anxious postscript --
Nerves redux --
Context.
Responsibility: Edward Shorter.
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Abstract:

"In this provocative book, Edward Shorter describes how in the 19th century patients with anxiety, fatigue and unable to sleep and obsess about the whole thing were considered "nervous," and when they lost control it was a "nervous breakdown." Then psychiatry turned its back on the whole concept of nerves, and--first under the influence of Freud's psychoanalysis and then the influence of the pharmaceutical industry--the diagnosis of depression took center stage. The result has been a scientific disaster, leading to the misdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment (with "antidepressants") of millions of patients. And with the new 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5), the trend of inappropriate treatment is sure to continue. Urging that the diagnosis of depression be re-thought, this book turns a dramatic page in the understanding of psychiatric symptoms that are as common as the common cold. A gripping historical argument on psychiatric diagnosis and its flawed heritage and future."--Jacket.

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A fascinating and erudite volume Historians and practitioners of psychiatry, psychology, neuroscience, and many other mental health professions will find this book illuminating, interesting, and Read more...

 
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