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How much is enough? : money and the good life

Autore: Robert Skidelsky; Edward Skidelsky
Editore: New York : Other Press, ©2012.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : EnglishVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
Analyzes questions that arose from the 2008 financial crisis while assessing the predictions of John Maynard Keynes, sharing the authors' views of a positive life and how recent generations have traded morality for wealth.
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Informazioni aggiuntive sul formato: Electronic version:
Skidelsky, Robert Jacob Alexander, 1939-
How much is enough?
New York : Other Press, ©2012
(OCoLC)803380372
Tipo documento: Book
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Robert Skidelsky; Edward Skidelsky
ISBN: 9781590515075 1590515072
Numero OCLC: 754714311
Descrizione: x, 243 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Contenuti: Keynes's mistake --
The Faustian bargain --
The uses of wealth --
The mirage of happiness --
Limits to growth : natural or moral? --
Elements of the good life --
Exits from the rat race.
Responsabilità: Robert Skidelsky & Edward Skidelsky.

Abstract:

Analyzes questions that arose from the 2008 financial crisis while assessing the predictions of John Maynard Keynes, sharing the authors' views of a positive life and how recent generations have traded morality for wealth.

What constitutes the good life? What is the true value of money? Why do we work such long hours merely to acquire greater wealth? These are some of the questions that many asked themselves when the financial system crashed in 2008. Authors Robert and Edward Skidelsky begin with he great economist John Maynard Keynes. In 1930 Keynes predicted that, within a century, per capita income would steadily rise, people's basic needs would be met, and no one would have to work more than fifteen hours a week. Clearly, we has wrong: though income has increased as he envisioned, people's wants have seemingly gone unsatisfied and they continue to work long hours. The Skidelskys explain why Keynes was mistaken. Arguing from the premise that economics is a moral science, they trace the concept of the good life from Aristotle to the present and show how our lives over the last half century have strayed from that ideal. Finally, they issue a call to rethink what really matters in our lives and how to attain it.

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