skip to content
How Rome fell : death of a superpower Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

How Rome fell : death of a superpower

Author: Adrian Keith Goldsworthy
Publisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2009.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable. Its vast territory accounted for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in Western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken Eastern Empire remained. What accounts for this improbable decline? Here, Adrian Goldsworthy applies the scholarship, perspective, and narrative skill that defined his monumental Caesar  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Adrian Keith Goldsworthy
ISBN: 9780300137194 0300137192 9780300164268 0300164262
OCLC Number: 262432329
Description: x, 531 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Contents: Introduction : The big question --
pt. 1. Crisis? The third century --
The kingdom of gold --
The secret of empire --
Imperial women --
King of kings --
Barbarians --
The queen and the 'necessary' emperor --
Crisis --
pt. 2. Recovery? The fourth century --
The four--Diocletian and the tetrarchy --
The Christian --
Rivals --
Enemies --
The pagan --
Goths --
East and west --
pt. 3. Fall? The fifth and sixth centuries --
Barbarians and Romans : generals and rebels --
The sister and the eternal city --
The Hun --
Sunset on an outpost of empire --
Emperors, kings and warlords --
West and east --
Rise and fall --
Conclusion : A simple answer --
Epilogue : An even simpler moral.
Responsibility: Adrian Goldsworthy.

Abstract:

"In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable. Its vast territory accounted for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in Western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken Eastern Empire remained. What accounts for this improbable decline? Here, Adrian Goldsworthy applies the scholarship, perspective, and narrative skill that defined his monumental Caesar to address perhaps the greatest of all historical questions - how Rome fell. It was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Goldsworthy pays particular attention to the willingness of Roman soldiers to fight and kill each other. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state."--Publisher description.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/262432329> # How Rome fell : death of a superpower
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:Book ;
   library:oclcnum "262432329" ;
   library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Place/new_haven> ; # New Haven
   library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/ctu> ;
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1204885> ; # Rome (Empire)
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Event/284_476> ; # 284-476
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Topic/rome_history_empire_284_476> ; # Rome--History--Empire, 284-476
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Event/geschichte_217_476> ; # Geschichte 217-476.
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Place/romerska_riket> ; # Romerska riket
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Place/rome> ; # Rome
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Topic/untergang> ; # Untergang
   schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/937.09/e22/> ;
   schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Place/romisches_reich> ; # Römisches Reich.
   schema:bookFormat bgn:PrintBook ;
   schema:creator <http://viaf.org/viaf/17385961> ; # Adrian Keith Goldsworthy
   schema:datePublished "2009" ;
   schema:description ""In AD 200, the Roman Empire seemed unassailable. Its vast territory accounted for most of the known world. By the end of the fifth century, Roman rule had vanished in Western Europe and much of northern Africa, and only a shrunken Eastern Empire remained. What accounts for this improbable decline? Here, Adrian Goldsworthy applies the scholarship, perspective, and narrative skill that defined his monumental Caesar to address perhaps the greatest of all historical questions - how Rome fell. It was a period of remarkable personalities, from the philosopher-emperor Marcus Aurelius to emperors like Diocletian, who portrayed themselves as tough, even brutal, soldiers. It was a time of revolutionary ideas, especially in religion, as Christianity went from persecuted sect to the religion of state and emperors. Goldsworthy pays particular attention to the willingness of Roman soldiers to fight and kill each other. Ultimately, this is the story of how an empire without a serious rival rotted from within, its rulers and institutions putting short-term ambition and personal survival over the wider good of the state."--Publisher description."@en ;
   schema:description "Introduction : The big question -- pt. 1. Crisis? The third century -- The kingdom of gold -- The secret of empire -- Imperial women -- King of kings -- Barbarians -- The queen and the 'necessary' emperor -- Crisis -- pt. 2. Recovery? The fourth century -- The four--Diocletian and the tetrarchy -- The Christian -- Rivals -- Enemies -- The pagan -- Goths -- East and west -- pt. 3. Fall? The fifth and sixth centuries -- Barbarians and Romans : generals and rebels -- The sister and the eternal city -- The Hun -- Sunset on an outpost of empire -- Emperors, kings and warlords -- West and east -- Rise and fall -- Conclusion : A simple answer -- Epilogue : An even simpler moral."@en ;
   schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/793133582> ;
   schema:genre "History"@en ;
   schema:inLanguage "en" ;
   schema:name "How Rome fell : death of a superpower"@en ;
   schema:productID "262432329" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/262432329#PublicationEvent/new_haven_yale_university_press_2009> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Agent/yale_university_press> ; # Yale University Press
   schema:url <http://bvbr.bib-bvb.de:8991/F?func=service&doc_library=BVB01&local_base=BVB01&doc_number=017364058&line_number=0001&func_code=DB_RECORDS&service_type=MEDIA> ;
   schema:url <http://bvbr.bib-bvb.de:8991/F?func=service&doc_library=BVB01&doc_number=017364058&line_number=0001&func_code=DB_RECORDS&service_type=MEDIA> ;
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780300164268> ;
   schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780300137194> ;
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/262432329> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Agent/yale_university_press> # Yale University Press
    a bgn:Agent ;
   schema:name "Yale University Press" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Event/geschichte_217_476> # Geschichte 217-476.
    a schema:Event ;
   schema:name "Geschichte 217-476." ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/793133582#Topic/rome_history_empire_284_476> # Rome--History--Empire, 284-476
    a schema:Intangible ;
   schema:name "Rome--History--Empire, 284-476"@en ;
    .

<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1204885> # Rome (Empire)
    a schema:Place ;
   schema:name "Rome (Empire)" ;
    .

<http://viaf.org/viaf/17385961> # Adrian Keith Goldsworthy
    a schema:Person ;
   schema:familyName "Goldsworthy" ;
   schema:givenName "Adrian Keith" ;
   schema:name "Adrian Keith Goldsworthy" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780300137194>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "0300137192" ;
   schema:isbn "9780300137194" ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780300164268>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
   schema:isbn "0300164262" ;
   schema:isbn "9780300164268" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.