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How to think about science. Part 9

Auteur : Rupert Sheldrake; David Cayley; Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Éditeur : [Toronto : CBC Radio One, 2008]
Édition/format :   Livre audio sur CD : CD audio : Anglais
Base de données :WorldCat
Résumé :
In 1981 British biologist Rupert Sheldrake published A New Science of Life. The book argued that genes alone were not enough to account for life's intricate patterns of form and behaviour. There must be, Sheldrake suggested, some sort of form-giving field that holds the memory of each thing's proper shape - he called it a morphogenetic field. This intriguing idea was widely discussed in the months after the book's  Lire la suite...
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Détails

Genre/forme : Interviews
Personne nommée : Rupert Sheldrake; Rupert Sheldrake
Type d’ouvrage : Livre audio, etc.
Format : Enregistrement sonore
Tous les auteurs / collaborateurs : Rupert Sheldrake; David Cayley; Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
Numéro OCLC : 268677180
Notes : Originally broadcast on CBC Radio One's program, Ideas on January 23, 2008.
Compact disc.
Interprète(s) : Presented by David Cayley.
Description : 1 sound disc (54 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.
Autres titres : How to think about science.
Ideas (Radio program)

Résumé :

In 1981 British biologist Rupert Sheldrake published A New Science of Life. The book argued that genes alone were not enough to account for life's intricate patterns of form and behaviour. There must be, Sheldrake suggested, some sort of form-giving field that holds the memory of each thing's proper shape - he called it a morphogenetic field. This intriguing idea was widely discussed in the months after the book's publication. Then the editor of the prestigious scientific journal Nature, Sir John Maddox, wrote an editorial in which violently denounced Sheldrake's work and called it "the best candidate for burning there has been for many years." Years later in an interview with the BBC, he defended his denunciation on the grounds that Sheldrake's view was scientific "heresy." Maddox's attack stuck Sheldrake a reputation for flakiness that still lingers. A few years ago Nobel physicist Steven Weinberg was still referring to the theory as "a crackpot fantasy." But, for Rupert Sheldrake, this zealous policing of the boundaries of science only proved that scientific materialism had hardened into a rigid and inhibiting dogmatism. He carried on with the research program he had put forward in A New Science of Life. Today on Ideas he shares the story of his journey with Ideas producer David Cayley.

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Données liées


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