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Howard Zinn : a radical American vision

Author: Davis D Joyce; Noam Chomsky
Publisher: Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This first-ever biography of Howard Zinn traces in broad strokes the story of his life, placing special emphasis on his involvement in both the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War protests. Biographer and historian Davis Joyce summarizes each of Zinn's books within the context of his life, analyzes the evolution of Zinn's ideas, and concludes with a preliminary assessment of his life's work." "Joyce argues  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Book reviews
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Joyce, Davis D., 1940-
Howard Zinn.
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2003
(OCoLC)607031726
Online version:
Joyce, Davis D., 1940-
Howard Zinn.
Amherst, N.Y. : Prometheus Books, 2003
(OCoLC)631449704
Named Person: Howard Zinn; Howard Zinn; Howard Zinn; Howard Zinn; Howard Zinn
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Davis D Joyce; Noam Chomsky
ISBN: 1591021316 9781591021315
OCLC Number: 52806025
Description: 268 p., [4] p. of plates : ports. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The life and writings of Howard Zinn : a brief chronology --
Growing up class-conscious, 1922-1956 --
The South and the movement, 1956-1964 --
You can't be neutral on a moving train, 1973-1988 --
Failure to quit, 1988-Present --
Howard Zinn's radical American vision : a preliminary assessment.
Responsibility: Davis D. Joyce ; foreword by Noam Chomsky.
More information:

Abstract:

"This first-ever biography of Howard Zinn traces in broad strokes the story of his life, placing special emphasis on his involvement in both the civil rights movement and the Vietnam War protests. Biographer and historian Davis Joyce summarizes each of Zinn's books within the context of his life, analyzes the evolution of Zinn's ideas, and concludes with a preliminary assessment of his life's work." "Joyce argues that Zinn's views are radical because they seek to bring about fundamental change in the political, social, and economic order. No armchair historian, Zinn has spent his whole life working for change and crusading for peace and justice. In a crucial and often-quoted passage from A People's History, Zinn boldly declares his agenda: "I prefer to try to tell the story of the discovery of America from the viewpoint of the Arawaks, of the Constitution from the standpoint of the slaves, of Andrew Jackson as seen by the Cherokees ... of the rise of industrialism as seen by the young women in the Lowell textile mills."" "Though some would label Zinn's position anti-American, Joyce contends that Zinn's approach is rooted in the very ideals upon which the United States was founded, especially those embodied in the Declaration of Independence. His life has been motivated by the vision of what America could be, as opposed to what it actually is, and has been dedicated to the struggle to make that vision a reality. Joyce also considers how Zinn fits into the New Left, radical school of historical writing of the 1960s and beyond."--Jacket.

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