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The Hunger games and philosophy : a critique of pure treason

Author: George A Dunn; Nicolas Michaud
Publisher: Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, ©2012.
Series: Blackwell philosophy and popculture series.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"A philosophical exploration of Suzanne Collins's New York Times bestselling series, just in time for the release of The Hunger Games movie. Katniss Everdeen is 'the girl who was on fire, ' but she is also the girl who made us think, dream, question authority, and rebel. The post-apocalyptic world of Panem's twelve districts is a divided society on the brink of war and struggling to survive, while the Capitol lives  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Hunger games and philosophy.
Hoboken, N.J. : Wiley, ©2012
(DLC) 2012002025
(OCoLC)748330610
Named Person: Suzanne Collins; Suzanne Collins; Suzanne Collins
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: George A Dunn; Nicolas Michaud
ISBN: 9781118206027 1118206029 9781118206034 1118206037 9781118206041 1118206045 1280589779 9781280589775
OCLC Number: 775301828
Description: 1 online resource (x, 310 pages).
Contents: "The final word on entertainment": mimetic and monstrous art in the Hunger games / Brian McDonald --
"Somewhere between hair ribbons and rainbows": how even the shortest song can change the world / Anne Torkelson --
"I will be your mockingjay": the power and paradox of metaphor in the Hunger games trilogy / Jill Olthouse --
"The odds have not been very dependable of late": morality and luck in the Hunger games trilogy / George A. Dunn --
The joy of watching others suffer: Schadenfreude and the Hunger games / Andrew Shaffer --
"So here I am in his debt again": Katniss, gifts, and invisible strings / Jennifer Culver --
Competition and kindness: the Darwinian world of the Hunger games / Abigail Mann --
"No mutt is good"-really? Creating interspecies chimeras / Jason T. Eberl --
Why Katniss chooses Peeta: looking at love through a stoic lens / Abigail E. Myers --
"She has no idea. The effect she can have.": Katniss and the politics of gender / Jessica Miller --
Sometimes the world is hungry for people who care: Katniss and the feminist care ethic / Lindsey Issow Averill --
Why does Katniss fail at everything she fakes? Being versus seeming to be in the Hunger games trilogy / Dereck Coatney --
Who is Peeta Mellark? The problem of identity in Panem / Nicolas Michaud --
"Safe to do what?": morality and the war of all against all in the arena / Joseph J. Foy --
Starting fires can get you burned: the just-war tradition and the rebellion against the capitol / Louis Melançon --
The tribute's dilemma: the Hunger games and game theory / Andrew Zimmerman Jones --
Discipline and the docile body: regulating hungers in the capitol / Christina Van Dyke --
"All of this is wrong": why one of Rome's greatest thinkers would despise the capitol / Adam Barkman --
Class is in session: power and privilege in Panem / Chad William Timm.
Series Title: Blackwell philosophy and popculture series.
Responsibility: edited by George A. Dunn and Nicolas Michaud.

Abstract:

"A philosophical exploration of Suzanne Collins's New York Times bestselling series, just in time for the release of The Hunger Games movie. Katniss Everdeen is 'the girl who was on fire, ' but she is also the girl who made us think, dream, question authority, and rebel. The post-apocalyptic world of Panem's twelve districts is a divided society on the brink of war and struggling to survive, while the Capitol lives in the lap of luxury and pure contentment. At every turn in the Hunger Games trilogy, Katniss, Peeta, Gale, and their many allies wrestle with harrowing choices and ethical dilemmas that push them to the brink. Is it okay for Katniss to break the law to ensure her family's survival? Do ordinary moral rules apply in the Arena? Can the world of The Hunger Games shine a light into the dark corners of our world? Why do we often enjoy watching others suffer? How can we distinguish between what's Real and Not Real? This book draws on some of history's most engaging philosophical thinkers to take you deeper into the story and its themes, such as sacrifice, altruism, moral choice, and gender"--Provided by publisher.

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