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I fear I shall never leave this island : life in a Civil War prison

Author: Wesley Makely; David R Bush
Publisher: Gainesville : University Press of Florida, ©2011.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Being a prisoner of war during the American Civil War was a plight full of unknowns. Both the Union and the Confederacy had to manage increasing numbers of captured soldiers. Many had served together before the war but now found themselves on opposite sides. A prisoner exchange system was developed early in the war to return prisoners to their homeland. Unfortunately, by May of 1863, exchange was no longer assured  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Correspondence
Personal narratives, Confederate
Named Person: Wesley Makely; Kate Makely
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Wesley Makely; David R Bush
ISBN: 9780813037448 0813037441 0813044081 9780813044088
OCLC Number: 709674055
Description: xiii, 269 p. : ill., map ; 24 cm.
Contents: Johnson's Island Prison --
Where is your letter? (August 16-December 13, 1863) --
Thoughts of exchange (December 24, 1863-May 8, 1864) --
Sending images (May 11-September 15, 1864) --
Hard rubber and hard times (September 19, 1864-March 12, 1865) --
Going home (March 21-April 29, 1865) --
The prisoner-of-war experience.
Responsibility: [edited and annotated by] David R. Bush.

Abstract:

"Being a prisoner of war during the American Civil War was a plight full of unknowns. Both the Union and the Confederacy had to manage increasing numbers of captured soldiers. Many had served together before the war but now found themselves on opposite sides. A prisoner exchange system was developed early in the war to return prisoners to their homeland. Unfortunately, by May of 1863, exchange was no longer assured ... In fact, few exchanges took place, and the prospect of being exchanged was slight. Thus prisoners like Captain Makely faced the reality of being a prisoner for an indefinite period of time unless they attempted to escape. The story of Kate's and Wesley's reactions to his imprisonment unfolds through their correspondence. Their frustration, pain, despair, suffering, struggle, and at times even their happiness are manifest in their letters. These are a firsthand account of life on the island, offering a picture of how lives are affected by war and imprisonment. The prisoners at Johnson's Island expressed a continual desire to hear from family and friends. The question of their return to the South through exchange was a constant source of frustration. This set of letters provides insight into the day-to-day struggle of imprisonment, a situation not unique to the Civil War"--P. 2.

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Linked Data


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