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I know who you are and I saw what you did : social networks and the death of privacy

Author: Lori B Andrews
Publisher: New York : Free Press, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st Free Press hardcover edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Andrews writes about the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web. Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. An ordinary individual can be a reporter, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster or a political crisis. A layperson can be a scientist, participating in a crowd sourced research project or an investigator, helping cops solve  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Lori B Andrews
ISBN: 9781451650518 1451650515 1451651066 9781451651065
OCLC Number: 709673179
Description: x, 253 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Facebook nation --
George Orwell ... meet Mark Zuckerberg --
Second self --
Technology and fundamental rights --
The right to connect --
Freedom of speech --
Lethal advocacy --
Privacy of place --
Privacy of information --
FYI or TMI?: social networks and the right to a relationship with your children --
Social networks and the judicial system --
The right to a fair trial --
The right to due process --
Slouching toward a constitution.
Responsibility: Lori Andrews.

Abstract:

Andrews writes about the widespread misuse of our personal online data and creates a Constitution for the web. Social networks are the defining cultural movement of our time. An ordinary individual can be a reporter, alerting the world to breaking news of a natural disaster or a political crisis. A layperson can be a scientist, participating in a crowd sourced research project or an investigator, helping cops solve a crime. But as we work and chat and date (and sometimes even have sex) over the web, traditional rights may be slipping away. Colleges and employers routinely reject applicants because of information found on social networks. Cops use photos from people's profiles to charge them with crimes, or argue for harsher sentences. Robbers use postings about vacations to figure out when to break into homes. At one school, officials used cameras on students' laptops to spy on them in their bedrooms. The same power of information that can topple governments can also topple a person's career, marriage, or future.

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"Unnerving narrative about the misuse of personal online information--without our knowledge--to track, judge and harm us in innumerable aspects of our lives. Read more...

 
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