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Ibsen and the Greeks : the classical Greek dimension in selected works of Henrik Ibsen as mediated by German and Scandinavian culture

Autor Norman Rhodes
Vydavatel: Lewisburg [Pa.] : Bucknell University Press ; London : Associated University Presses, ©1995.
Vydání/formát:   book : EnglishZobrazit všechny vydání a formáty
Databáze:WorldCat
Zhrnutí:
"Was Ibsen influenced by Greek culture? Were allusions to the Greeks configured in the Norwegian playwright's works? According to author Norman Rhodes, whether consciously or unconsciously, many of Ibsen's plays are encoded with veiled references to ancient Greek culture. Rhodes also postulates that Ibsen's perception of the importance of the Greeks was most likely mediated to him through German Romanticism and  Read more...
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Detaily

Doplňující formát: Online version:
Rhodes, Norman, 1942-
Ibsen and the Greeks.
Lewisburg [Pa.] : Bucknell University Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c1995
(OCoLC)624384745
Osoba: Henrik Ibsen; Henrik Ibsen; Henrik Ibsen; Henrik Ibsen; Henrik Ibsen; Henrik Ibsen
Typ dokumentu: Book
Všichni autoři/tvůrci: Norman Rhodes
ISBN: 0838752985 9780838752982
OCLC číslo: 31295117
Popis: 209 p. ; 26 cm.
Obsahy: 1. Meanings and Boundaries: The Influence of German Culture and Kierkegaard --
2. Inscribing Ideologies: Ibsen's Essays, Articles, and Prologues --
3. Early Interventions: Catiline (1850) to Love's Comedy (1862) --
4. Anxiety and Influence: Brand (1866), Peer Gynt (1867), and the Iliad and Odyssey --
5. Hegelian Complicity: Emperor and Galilean (1873) - The Third Empire --
6. Signifying Relations: A Doll House (1879) and Antigone --
7. Subjective Hegemony: An Enemy of the People (1882), Dr. Stockmann, Socrates, and Oedipus --
8. Fatal Antinomies: The Final Plays and The Revival of Euripides --
9. Fissures in the Masks: Hidden Meanings and Traces in Ibsen's Discursive Practice.
Odpovědnost: Norman Rhodes.
Více informací:

Anotace:

"Was Ibsen influenced by Greek culture? Were allusions to the Greeks configured in the Norwegian playwright's works? According to author Norman Rhodes, whether consciously or unconsciously, many of Ibsen's plays are encoded with veiled references to ancient Greek culture. Rhodes also postulates that Ibsen's perception of the importance of the Greeks was most likely mediated to him through German Romanticism and Scandinavian culture." "According to Rhodes, numerous echoes of Greek literature resonate in such early Ibsen plays as Catiline, The Warrior's Barrow, Olaf Liljerkrans, and Love's Comedy. Ibsen's Brand and Peer Gynt are a dialectic pair which in key ways are suggestive of Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, A Doll House has important parallels with Sophocles' Antigone, and An Enemy of the People correlates with both Plato's Apology and Sophocles' Oedipus Tyrannos. Moreover, a Euripidean sense of fatal irrationality seems inscribed in Ibsen's final plays: the protagonists John Rosmer, Hedda Gabler, Master Builder Solness, John Gabriel Borkman, and the sculptor Rubek all destroy themselves."--BOOK JACKET.

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Propojená data


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