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The idea of Latin America

Author: Walter Mignolo
Publisher: Malden, MA ; Oxford : Blackwell Pub., 2005.
Series: Blackwell manifestos.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The term "Latin" America supposes that there is an America that is Latin, which can be defined in opposition to one that is not. This geo-political manifesto revisits the idea of Latinity, charting the history of the concept from its emergence in Europe under France's leadership, through its appropriation by the Creole elite of South America and the Spanish Caribbean in the second half of the nineteenth century, up  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Walter Mignolo
ISBN: 9781405100854 1405100850 9781405100861 1405100869
OCLC Number: 58546935
Description: xx, 198 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: The Americas, Christian expansion, and the modern/colonial foundation of racism --
"Latin" America and the first reordering of the modern/colonial world --
After "Latin" America : the colonial wound and the epistemic geo-/body-political shift.
Series Title: Blackwell manifestos.
Responsibility: Walter D. Mignolo.
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Abstract:

"The term "Latin" America supposes that there is an America that is Latin, which can be defined in opposition to one that is not. This geo-political manifesto revisits the idea of Latinity, charting the history of the concept from its emergence in Europe under France's leadership, through its appropriation by the Creole elite of South America and the Spanish Caribbean in the second half of the nineteenth century, up to the present day." "Reinstating the Indigenous peoples, the enormous population of African descent, and the 40 million Latinos/as in the US that are rendered invisible by the image of a homogeneous Latin America, the author asks what is at stake in the survival of an idea which subdivides the Americas. He explains why an "American Union" similar to the European Union is at this point unthinkable and he insists on the pressing need to leave behind an idea of Latinity which belongs to the Creole/Mestizo mentality of the nineteenth century."--Jacket.

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