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Idiosyncratic identities : artists at the end of the avant-garde

Author: Donald B Kuspit
Publisher: New York : Cambridge University Press, 1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Postmodernism has been described as a decadent and pluralistic period in which avant-garde art has been institutionalized, stereotyped, and effectively neutralized; and where models of art seem to stand in ironical, nihilistic relationship to each other. In this study, Donald Kuspit argues that only the idiosyncratic artist remains credible and convincing in the postmodern era, he or she relentlessly pursuing a  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Donald B Kuspit
ISBN: 0521553792 9780521553797 052155652X 9780521556521
OCLC Number: 33360109
Description: xii, 368 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
Contents: Introduction: Idiosyncrasy: The Final Frontier --
1. The Opera Is Over: A Critique of Eighties Sensibility --
2. The Appropriation of Marginal Art in the 1980s --
3. The Magic Kingdom of the Museum --
4. Sizing Art Up (and Down): The Issue of Quality --
5. The Short, Happy Life of the Work of Art: From Artifact to Art to Arty Fact --
6. The End of Creative Imagination --
7. Marcel Duchamp, Imposter Artist --
8. Act Out, Turn Off --
9. The Horse in the Industrial Age: Deborah Butterfield's Sculptures --
10. Improbable Portraits: Gerge Condo's Drolleries --
11. Paradox Perfected: Agnes Denes's Pyramids --
12. The Cunning of Unreason: Charles Hinman's Absurdist Constructions --
13. Alfred Jensen: Systems Mystagogue --
14. Wolfgang Laib's Mystical Revolution --
15. Carlo Maria Mariani: The Reenactment of Beauty --
16. Robert Mapplethorpe: Aestheticising the Perverse --
17. Jackson Pollock: Late Works, 1952-1955 --
18. Voluptuous Technology: Keith Sonnier's Painterly Sculpture.
Responsibility: Donald Kuspit.
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Abstract:

Postmodernism has been described as a decadent and pluralistic period in which avant-garde art has been institutionalized, stereotyped, and effectively neutralized; and where models of art seem to stand in ironical, nihilistic relationship to each other. In this study, Donald Kuspit argues that only the idiosyncratic artist remains credible and convincing in the postmodern era, he or she relentlessly pursuing a sense of artistic and human identity in a situation where there are no guidelines, art historically or socially. Idiosyncratic art, Kuspit posits, is a radically personal art that establishes unconscious communication between individuals in doubt of their identity. Functioning as a medium of self-identification, it affords a sense of authentic selfhood and communicative intimacy in a postmodern society where authenticity and intimacy seem irrelevant and absurd.

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Linked Data


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