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"If it is too inconvenient I'm not going after it" : convenience as a critical factor in information-seeking behaviors

Author: Lynn Silipigni Connaway; Timothy J Dickey; Marie L Radford
Edition/Format:   Article : English
Publication:Library & information science research, Vol. 33, Issue 3 (July 2011)
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In today's fast-paced world, anecdotal evidence suggests that information tends to inundate people, and users of information systems want to find information quickly and conveniently. Empirical evidence for convenience as a critical factor is explored in the data from two multi-year, user study projects funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The theoretical framework for this understanding is  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Use studies
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Article, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Lynn Silipigni Connaway; Timothy J Dickey; Marie L Radford
ISSN:0740-8188
OCLC Number: 738442155
Notes: In: Library & Information Science Research (Volume 33, Issue 3, July 2011) p. 179-190.
Description: pages 179-190. : tables
Responsibility: Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Timothy J. Dickey, Marie L. Radford.

Abstract:

In today's fast-paced world, anecdotal evidence suggests that information tends to inundate people, and users of information systems want to find information quickly and conveniently. Empirical evidence for convenience as a critical factor is explored in the data from two multi-year, user study projects funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The theoretical framework for this understanding is founded in the concepts of bounded rationality and rational choice theory, with Savolainen's (2006) concept of time as a context in information seeking, as well as gratification theory, informing the emphasis on the seekers' time horizons. Convenience is a situational criterion in peoples' choices and actions during all stages of the information-seeking process. The concept of convenience can include their choice of an information source, their satisfaction with the source and its ease of use, and their time horizon in information seeking. The centrality of convenience is especially prevalent among the younger subjects ("millennials") in both studies, but also holds across all demographic categories -- age, gender, academic role, or user or non-user of virtual reference services. These two studies further indicate that convenience is a factor for making choices in a variety of situations, including both academic information seeking and everyday-life information seeking, although it plays different roles in different situations.

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