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Imagining Indians in the Southwest : persistent visions of a primitive past

Author: Leah Dilworth
Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution Press, ©1996.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In Imagining Indians in the Southwest, Leah Dilworth examines the creation and enduring potency of the early twentieth-century myth of the primitive Indian. She shows how visions of Indians - created not only by tourism but also by anthropologists, collectors of Indian crafts, and modernist writers - have reflected white anxieties about such issues as the value of labor in an industrialized society, racial  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Pictorial works
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Dilworth, Leah.
Imagining Indians in the Southwest.
Washington : Smithsonian Institution Press, c1996
(OCoLC)605328281
Online version:
Dilworth, Leah.
Imagining Indians in the Southwest.
Washington : Smithsonian Institution Press, c1996
(OCoLC)607739914
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Leah Dilworth
ISBN: 1560986417 9781560986416 1560988347 9781560988342
OCLC Number: 33948964
Description: xiv, 274 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. Representing the Hopi Snake Dance. Textualizing the Snake Dance. The Snake Dance in Ethnographic Exhibits. The Snake Dance as a Tourist Attraction. Cultural Incorporation of the Snake Dance. The Snake Dance as a Spectacle --
2. Discovering Indians in Fred Harvey's Southwest. The Rise of the Fred Harvey Company. The Spectale of Fred Harvey's Southwest. Appearing and Disappearing in Fred Harvey's Southwest. The Machinery of the Tourist Spectacle. The Touristic Exchange. Re-presenting the Touristic Encounter --
3. The Spectacle of Indian Artisanal Labor. The Development of Markets for Indian Crafts. The Collector-Connoisseur. The Indian Artisan. Imagining Primitive Labor. Artisanal Craft as a Tool of Reform. Limitations of the Artisan Stereotype --
4. Modernism, Primitivism, and the American Rhythm. Modernist Primitivism. Cultural Nationalism and Regionalism. Primitivism as a Cultural Cure. The Indian and Aesthetic Authenticity. The Semiotics of Playing Indian.
Responsibility: Leah Dilworth.

Abstract:

Examines the creation and enduring potency of the early twentieth-century myth of the primitive Indian. This book also demonstrates how visions of Indians - created by tour companies,  Read more...

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