passa ai contenuti
Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration's power marketing alternatives Anteprima di questo documento
ChiudiAnteprima di questo documento
Stiamo controllando…

Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration's power marketing alternatives

Autore: Edwards, B.K.; Palmer, S.C.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E.; Argonne National Lab.; United States. Department of Energy.; United States. Department of Energy. Office of Scientific and Technical Information.
Editore: Washington, D.C. : United States. Dept. of Energy ; Oak Ridge, Tenn. : Distributed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, U.S. Dept. of Energy, 1995.
Edizione/Formato:   eBook : Document : National government publication : English
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation's irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated  Per saperne di più…
Voto:

(non ancora votato) 0 con commenti - Diventa il primo.

Soggetti
Altri come questo

 

Trova una copia online

Collegamenti a questo documento

Trova una copia in biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Stiamo ricercando le biblioteche che possiedono questo documento…

Dettagli

Tipo materiale: Document, Government publication, National government publication, Risorsa internet
Tipo documento: Internet Resource, Computer File
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Edwards, B.K.; Palmer, S.C.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E.; Argonne National Lab.; United States. Department of Energy.; United States. Department of Energy. Office of Scientific and Technical Information.
Numero OCLC: 68369924
Note: Published through the Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information.
03/01/1995.
"Anl/dis/tm--9."
"DE96003801."
Edwards, B.K.; Palmer, S.C.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E.
Descrizione: 77 pages : digital, PDF file.

Abstract:

Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation's irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration's Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western's wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western's power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western's Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

Commenti

Commenti degli utenti
Recuperando commenti GoodReads…
Stiamo recuperando commenti DOGObooks

Etichette

Diventa il primo.
Conferma questa richiesta

Potresti aver già richiesto questo documento. Seleziona OK se si vuole procedere comunque con questa richiesta.

Dati collegati


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/68369924>
library:oclcnum"68369924"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/68369924>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:author
schema:author
schema:author
schema:author
schema:bookFormatschema:EBook
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/305307678>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"United States. Department of Energy. Office of Scientific and Technical Information."
schema:datePublished"1995"
schema:description"Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation's irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration's Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western's wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western's power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western's Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/40400514>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration's power marketing alternatives"@en
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:url<http://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/193650-5tSdm7/webviewable/>

Content-negotiable representations

Chiudi finestra

Per favore entra in WorldCat 

Non hai un account? Puoi facilmente crearne uno gratuito.