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Imperfect equality : African Americans and the confines of white racial attitudes in post-emancipation Maryland

Author: Richard Paul Fuke
Publisher: New York : Fordham University Press, 1999.
Series: Reconstructing America (Series), no. 2.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In Imperfect Equality, Richard Paul Fuke explores the immediate aftermath of slavery in Maryland, which differed in important ways from the slaveholding states of the South: Maryland never left the Union; white radicals had a period of access to power; and even prior to legal emancipation, a large free black population resided there. Moreover, the presence of Baltimore, a major city and port, provided abundant  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Paul Fuke
ISBN: 0823219623 9780823219629 0823219631 9780823219636
OCLC Number: 41223968
Description: xxv, 307 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. "Twill Be Very Different to Be Free" --
2. The Freedmen's Bureau --
3. A Few Acres of Land --
4. The Work of Children --
5. Community Schools --
6. Baltimore --
7. Suffrage --
8. Black Society --
9. Separate and Not Equal --
10. The Confines of White Racial Attitudes.
Series Title: Reconstructing America (Series), no. 2.
Responsibility: Richard Paul Fuke.
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Abstract:

The author of this work explores the immediate aftermath of slavery in Maryland, which differed ways from other slaveholding states of the South: it never left the Union; white radicals had access to  Read more...

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"Imperfect Equality is an authoritative and thought-provoking treatment of the singular struggle of Maryland African Americans to achieve the full rewards that the blessings of emancipation could not Read more...

 
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