skip to content
Implementing Semantic Web services : the SESA framework Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Implementing Semantic Web services : the SESA framework

Author: Dieter Fensel; Mick Kerrigan; Michał Zaremba
Publisher: Berlin : Springer, ©2008.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Service-oriented computing has become one of the predominant factors in IT research and development efforts over the last few years. In spite of several standardization efforts that advanced from research labs into industrial-strength technologies and tools, there is still much human effort required in the process of finding and executing Web services. Here, Dieter Fensel and his team lay the foundation for  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Implementing Semantic Web services.
Berlin : Springer, c2008
(OCoLC)191760020
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Dieter Fensel; Mick Kerrigan; Michał Zaremba
ISBN: 9783540770206 3540770208 3540770194 9783540770190
OCLC Number: 288566956
Description: 1 online resource (xvi, 322 p.) : ill.
Contents: Cover --
Contents --
Part I: Foundations --
1 From Web to Semantic Web --
1.1 The Web A Familiar Starting Point --
1.2 Architectural Principles of the World Wide Web --
1.3 The World Wide Web Consortium W3C --
1.4 Spawning the Semantic Web --
1.5 The Semantic Web --
1.6 The Semantic Web Future Prospects --
1.7 Summary --
2 Semantic Web Services --
2.1 Behavioral Perspective of the World Wide Web --
2.2 Web Services --
2.3 Semantic Web Services: The Future of Integration! --
2.4 The Ideal World --
2.5 Summary --
3 WSMO and WSML --
3.1 The Web Service Modeling Ontology --
3.2 The Web Service Modeling Language --
3.3 Summary --
Part II: SESA Environment --
4 Introduction to Semantically Enabled Service-oriented Architectures --
4.1 SESA Background --
4.2 Service Orientation --
4.3 Execution Environment for Semantic Web Services --
4.4 Governing Principles --
4.5 SESA Vision Global View --
4.6 SESA Roadmap --
4.7 SESA Research Areas and Goals --
4.8 Summary --
5 SESA Middleware --
5.1 Services Viewpoint --
5.2 Technology Viewpoint --
5.3 Summary --
6 SESA Execution Semantics --
6.1 Motivation --
6.2 Proposed Description Formalism --
6.3 Mandatory Execution Semantics --
6.4 Case Study Example of SESA Execution Semantics --
6.5 Technical Perspective on Execution Semantics --
6.6 Summary --
Part III: SESA Services --
7 Reasoning --
7.1 Reasoning Requirements --
7.2 Logical Background --
7.3 Reasoning Tasks --
7.4 Reasoning Within SESA --
7.5 A Generic Framework for Reasoning with WSML --
7.6 Rule Interchange Format --
7.7 Conclusion --
8 Discovery --
8.1 A Conceptual Model for Discovery --
8.2 Web Services at Various Levels of Abstraction --
8.3 Keyword-Based Discovery --
8.4 Discovery Based on Simple Semantic Descriptions --
8.5 Discovery Based on Rich Semantic Descriptions --
8.6 Summary --
9 Selection --
9.1 Introduction --
9.2 Nonfunctional Properties --
9.3 Selecting Services --
9.4 Related Work --
9.5 Summary --
10 Mediation --
10.1 Preliminaries --
10.2 Ontology-Based Data Mediation --
10.3 Behavioral Mediation --
10.4 Summary --
11 Storage and Internal Communication --
11.1 Introduction to Triple Space Computing --
11.2 Triple Space Kernel --
11.3 Role of Triple Space Computing in SESA --
11.4 Evaluation --
11.5 Summary --
Part IV: SESA Application and Compatible Systems --
12 SESA Application --
12.1 Case Scenario: B2B Integration --
12.2 Case Scenario: Voice and Data Integration --
12.3 Summary --
13 Compatible and Related Systems --
13.1 The Internet Reasoning Service --
13.2 Other WSMO-Compatible Tools --
13.3 Tools Based on OWL-S --
13.4 METEOR-S --
14 Conclusions and Outlook --
14.1 Why SOA? --
14.2 Future Work --
14.3 Commercialization --
References --
Index.
Responsibility: Dieter Fensel, Mick Kerrigan, Michal Zaremba, editors.
More information:

Abstract:

There is still much human effort needed to find and execute Web services. The authors lay the foundation for understanding the Semantic Web Services infrastructure, aimed at eliminating human  Read more...

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/288566956>
library:oclcnum"288566956"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/288566956>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"COMPUTERS--Online Services."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"COMPUTERS--System Administration--Storage & Retrieval."
schema:bookFormatschema:EBook
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"2008"
schema:datePublished"2008"
schema:description"Service-oriented computing has become one of the predominant factors in IT research and development efforts over the last few years. In spite of several standardization efforts that advanced from research labs into industrial-strength technologies and tools, there is still much human effort required in the process of finding and executing Web services. Here, Dieter Fensel and his team lay the foundation for understanding the Semantic Web Services infrastructure, aimed at eliminating human intervention and thus allowing for seamless integration of information systems. They focus on the currentl."
schema:description"Cover -- Contents -- Part I: Foundations -- 1 From Web to Semantic Web -- 1.1 The Web A Familiar Starting Point -- 1.2 Architectural Principles of the World Wide Web -- 1.3 The World Wide Web Consortium W3C -- 1.4 Spawning the Semantic Web -- 1.5 The Semantic Web -- 1.6 The Semantic Web Future Prospects -- 1.7 Summary -- 2 Semantic Web Services -- 2.1 Behavioral Perspective of the World Wide Web -- 2.2 Web Services -- 2.3 Semantic Web Services: The Future of Integration! -- 2.4 The Ideal World -- 2.5 Summary -- 3 WSMO and WSML -- 3.1 The Web Service Modeling Ontology -- 3.2 The Web Service Modeling Language -- 3.3 Summary -- Part II: SESA Environment -- 4 Introduction to Semantically Enabled Service-oriented Architectures -- 4.1 SESA Background -- 4.2 Service Orientation -- 4.3 Execution Environment for Semantic Web Services -- 4.4 Governing Principles -- 4.5 SESA Vision Global View -- 4.6 SESA Roadmap -- 4.7 SESA Research Areas and Goals -- 4.8 Summary -- 5 SESA Middleware -- 5.1 Services Viewpoint -- 5.2 Technology Viewpoint -- 5.3 Summary -- 6 SESA Execution Semantics -- 6.1 Motivation -- 6.2 Proposed Description Formalism -- 6.3 Mandatory Execution Semantics -- 6.4 Case Study Example of SESA Execution Semantics -- 6.5 Technical Perspective on Execution Semantics -- 6.6 Summary -- Part III: SESA Services -- 7 Reasoning -- 7.1 Reasoning Requirements -- 7.2 Logical Background -- 7.3 Reasoning Tasks -- 7.4 Reasoning Within SESA -- 7.5 A Generic Framework for Reasoning with WSML -- 7.6 Rule Interchange Format -- 7.7 Conclusion -- 8 Discovery -- 8.1 A Conceptual Model for Discovery -- 8.2 Web Services at Various Levels of Abstraction -- 8.3 Keyword-Based Discovery -- 8.4 Discovery Based on Simple Semantic Descriptions -- 8.5 Discovery Based on Rich Semantic Descriptions -- 8.6 Summary -- 9 Selection -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Nonfunctional Properties -- 9.3 Selecting Services -- 9.4 Related Work -- 9.5 Summary -- 10 Mediation -- 10.1 Preliminaries -- 10.2 Ontology-Based Data Mediation -- 10.3 Behavioral Mediation -- 10.4 Summary -- 11 Storage and Internal Communication -- 11.1 Introduction to Triple Space Computing -- 11.2 Triple Space Kernel -- 11.3 Role of Triple Space Computing in SESA -- 11.4 Evaluation -- 11.5 Summary -- Part IV: SESA Application and Compatible Systems -- 12 SESA Application -- 12.1 Case Scenario: B2B Integration -- 12.2 Case Scenario: Voice and Data Integration -- 12.3 Summary -- 13 Compatible and Related Systems -- 13.1 The Internet Reasoning Service -- 13.2 Other WSMO-Compatible Tools -- 13.3 Tools Based on OWL-S -- 13.4 METEOR-S -- 14 Conclusions and Outlook -- 14.1 Why SOA? -- 14.2 Future Work -- 14.3 Commercialization -- References -- Index."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/906054870>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Implementing Semantic Web services the SESA framework"
schema:numberOfPages"322"
schema:publisher
schema:url<http://public.eblib.com/EBLPublic/PublicView.do?ptiID=364214>
schema:url<http://www.springerlink.com/openurl.asp?genre=book&isbn=978-3-540-77019-0>
schema:url<http://www.books24x7.com/marc.asp?bookid=30964>
schema:url<http://www.myilibrary.com?id=179216>
schema:url<http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-77020-6>
schema:url<http://site.ebrary.com/id/10252039>
schema:url<http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=245307>
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.