passa ai contenuti
Anteprima di questo documento
ChiudiAnteprima di questo documento
Stiamo controllando…

"'In the same boat now' : peoples of the African diaspora and/as immigrants: the politics of race, migration, and nation in twentieth-century American literature

Autore: Joanna Christine Davis-McElligatt; Harry Stecopoulos; University of Iowa. Department of English.
Editore: [Iowa City, Iowa] : University of Iowa, 2010.
Tesi: Ph. D. thesis University of Iowa 2010.
Edizione/Formato:   Tesi/dissertazione : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : English
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
In this dissertation, I take seriously Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assertion that even though non-indigenous peoples in America "may have come over on different ships," they are all, in spite of and in the face of their particular ethnic, racial, gender, class, tribal, or national identities, nevertheless together "in the same boat now." In particular, in this project I reconstruct and reinterpret the process of  Per saperne di più…
Voto:

(non ancora votato) 0 con commenti - Diventa il primo.

Soggetti
Altri come questo

 

Trova una copia online

Collegamenti a questo documento

Trova una copia in biblioteca

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Stiamo ricercando le biblioteche che possiedono questo documento…

Dettagli

Genere/forma: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Persona incaricata: James Baldwin; William Faulkner; Paule Marshall; Gayl Jones; Chris Ware; James Baldwin; William Faulkner; Gayl Jones; Paule Marshall; Chris Ware
Tipo materiale: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Risorsa internet
Tipo documento: Internet Resource, Computer File
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: Joanna Christine Davis-McElligatt; Harry Stecopoulos; University of Iowa. Department of English.
Numero OCLC: 656565385
Note: Thesis supervisor: Harilaos Stecopoulos.
Descrizione: x, 355 pages : color illustrations
Dettagli: Mode of access: World Wide Web.; System requirements: Adobe Reader.
Responsabilità: by Joanna Christine Davis-McElligatt.

Abstract:

In this dissertation, I take seriously Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assertion that even though non-indigenous peoples in America "may have come over on different ships," they are all, in spite of and in the face of their particular ethnic, racial, gender, class, tribal, or national identities, nevertheless together "in the same boat now." In particular, in this project I reconstruct and reinterpret the process of migration, assimilation, and the realization of full sociopolitical participation in the United States in terms of the relationship between peoples of African descent--who were compelled to migrate as slaves across the Middle Passage, and who also voluntarily immigrated from various localities within the Black Atlantic--and select groups of immigrants from other locations around the globe. In my thesis, I concentrate on novels by William Faulkner, Paule Marshall, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, and cartoonist Chris Ware, and examine closely how these authors, in their respective texts, work to restructure, reimagine, and thereby challenge the enshrined American narratives of national belonging and acculturation through literary constructions of the identities and experiences of peoples of African descent, as migrants themselves, in tandem with their social, political, economic, sexual, racial, and cultural engagements with other immigrants to the nation-state. In the introduction to my text, I survey and carefully synthesize diverse literary, historical, sociological, postcolonial, and feminist approaches to and theories of the problems of race, immigration, and nationalization, and formulate a new critical interdisciplinary framework for the mutual (de)construction of peoples of African descent as immigrants among immigrants in America.

Commenti

Commenti degli utenti
Recuperando commenti GoodReads…
Stiamo recuperando commenti DOGObooks

Etichette

Diventa il primo.
Conferma questa richiesta

Potresti aver già richiesto questo documento. Seleziona OK se si vuole procedere comunque con questa richiesta.

Dati collegati


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/656565385>
library:oclcnum"656565385"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/656565385>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typej.2:Web_document
rdf:typej.2:Thesis
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/908732>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Emigration and immigration in literature"@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
<http://viaf.org/viaf/149455116>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"University of Iowa. Department of English."
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2010"
schema:description"In this dissertation, I take seriously Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assertion that even though non-indigenous peoples in America "may have come over on different ships," they are all, in spite of and in the face of their particular ethnic, racial, gender, class, tribal, or national identities, nevertheless together "in the same boat now." In particular, in this project I reconstruct and reinterpret the process of migration, assimilation, and the realization of full sociopolitical participation in the United States in terms of the relationship between peoples of African descent--who were compelled to migrate as slaves across the Middle Passage, and who also voluntarily immigrated from various localities within the Black Atlantic--and select groups of immigrants from other locations around the globe. In my thesis, I concentrate on novels by William Faulkner, Paule Marshall, James Baldwin, Gayl Jones, and cartoonist Chris Ware, and examine closely how these authors, in their respective texts, work to restructure, reimagine, and thereby challenge the enshrined American narratives of national belonging and acculturation through literary constructions of the identities and experiences of peoples of African descent, as migrants themselves, in tandem with their social, political, economic, sexual, racial, and cultural engagements with other immigrants to the nation-state. In the introduction to my text, I survey and carefully synthesize diverse literary, historical, sociological, postcolonial, and feminist approaches to and theories of the problems of race, immigration, and nationalization, and formulate a new critical interdisciplinary framework for the mutual (de)construction of peoples of African descent as immigrants among immigrants in America."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/572504613>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name""'In the same boat now' peoples of the African diaspora and/as immigrants: the politics of race, migration, and nation in twentieth-century American literature"@en
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:url<http://ir.uiowa.edu/etd/485>

Content-negotiable representations

Chiudi finestra

Per favore entra in WorldCat 

Non hai un account? Puoi facilmente crearne uno gratuito.