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An independent woman : the autobiography of Edith Guerrier

Author: Edith Guerrier; Molly Matson
Publisher: Amherst : University of Massachusetts Press, ©1992.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Edith Guerrier (1870-1958) embodied the ideals of the "New Women" who emerged by the thousands in turn-of-the-century America to take advantage of greater economic and educational opportunities for their sex. At the age of twenty-one, she began working with children in a settlement house in Boston's North End, where she soon maintained a reading room and a Boston Public Library delivery station. A pioneer in the new  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Guerrier, Edith, 1870-1958.
Independent woman.
Amherst : University of Massachusetts Press, c1992
(OCoLC)707180058
Named Person: Edith Guerrier; Edith Guerrier
Material Type: Biography, Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Edith Guerrier; Molly Matson
ISBN: 087023756X 9780870237560
OCLC Number: 23731895
Description: xxxix, 154 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. A Motherless Child, 1870-1883 --
2. Father and Daughter, 1883-1891 --
3. A Single Woman, 1891-1917 --
4. On Loan to Mr. Hoover, 1917-1919 --
5. A Civil Servant, 1919-1945 --
Epilogue, 1945-1950.
Responsibility: edited with an introduction by Molly Matson ; foreword by Polly Welts Kaufman.
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Abstract:

Edith Guerrier (1870-1958) embodied the ideals of the "New Women" who emerged by the thousands in turn-of-the-century America to take advantage of greater economic and educational opportunities for their sex. At the age of twenty-one, she began working with children in a settlement house in Boston's North End, where she soon maintained a reading room and a Boston Public Library delivery station. A pioneer in the new field of librarianship just opening to women, she founded many library clubs and eventually became the supervisor of branch libraries in Boston. Guerrier is perhaps best remembered for her work on behalf of young immigrant women in Boston's North End. Among the numerous "girls" clubs she founded was the Saturday Evening Girls, composed of young women ofJewish and Italian ancestry. Wanting to do more than simply "keep the girls off the street," she devised a plan to enable her charges to become financially self-sufficient. In 1908, with her lifelong companion Edith Brown, she began to develop what eventually became the Paul Revere Pottery. Potters worked an eight-hour day in an airy, healthful atmosphere, and received a decent wage, an annual paid vacation, and a daily hot lunch--all of which were virtually unheard of in the early twentieth-century workplace. Paul Revere Ware today is valued as a collector's item. Guerrier's autobiography has never been published. Her story takes us from her New England girlhood through her years on the midwestern frontier, to her education at Vermont Methodist Seminary and Female College, and finally through her odyssey in Boston, where she lived for most of her adult life. Molly Matson provides an introduction that examines Guerrier's life and several careers and discusses the history of turn-of-the-century Boston. In a substantive foreword, Polly Welts Kaufman situates Guerrier's autobiography within the context of recent scholarship on the changing roles of women during this period of American history.

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Linked Data


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