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Influenza 1918

Author: Robert KennerKen ChowderDavid G McCulloughLinda HuntRobert Kenner Films.All authors
Publisher: Arlington, Va. : PBS Home Video, ©1998.
Series: PBS Video reference library, v. 264.; American history video library, v. 264.
Edition/Format:   VHS video : VHS tape   Visual material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In September 1918, soldiers stationed near Boston suddenly began to die. Doctors found the victims' lungs filled with a strange blue fluid. They identified the cause as influenza, but it was unlike any strain ever seen, and medical science proved powerless against it. In desperation, people turned to folk remedies, while frantic officials closed all public places and everyone was required to wear masks. But the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Documentary television programs
Documentary films
Video recordings for the hearing impaired
History
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Robert Kenner; Ken Chowder; David G McCullough; Linda Hunt; Robert Kenner Films.; WGBH (Television station : Boston, Mass.); PBS Home Video.; PBS Video.
ISBN: 0780622073 9780780622074
OCLC Number: 40326430
Language Note: Closed-captioned.
Notes: Distributed also by PBS Video.
Originally broadcast as a episode of: The American Experience.
Credits: Cinematography, Don Lenzer ... [et al.] ; editor, Alison Ellwood ; narrator, Linda Hunt ; music, Mark Adler.
Performer(s): Series host: David McCullough.
Description: 1 videocassette (60 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 1/2 in.
Details: VHS; stereo.
Series Title: PBS Video reference library, v. 264.; American history video library, v. 264.
Other Titles: Influenza nineteen-eighteen
Worst epidemic in American history
American experience (Television program)
Responsibility: produced and directed by Robert Kenner ; written by Ken Chowder ; a Robert Kenner Films production for the American Experience ; WGBH.

Abstract:

In September 1918, soldiers stationed near Boston suddenly began to die. Doctors found the victims' lungs filled with a strange blue fluid. They identified the cause as influenza, but it was unlike any strain ever seen, and medical science proved powerless against it. In desperation, people turned to folk remedies, while frantic officials closed all public places and everyone was required to wear masks. But the virus was unstoppable, relentless, devastatingly lethal. By the time the epidemic ran its course, over 600,000 people were dead, more than all U.S. combat deaths of the 20th century.

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