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The informer

Author: Patrick F Sheeran
Publisher: Cork : Cork University Press in association with the Film Institute of Ireland, 2002.
Series: Ireland into film, 4.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Liam O'Flaherty's novel The Informer (1925) is what the author of this study calls a 'mythogenic text', i.e. one that lends itself easily to adaptations, recreations and renditions. To date there have been four film versions (Arthur Robison 1929, John Ford 1935, Jules Dassin 1968, Michael Byrne 1992) and at least as many stage versions. One of the reasons the novel has proved so attractive to filmmakers is that it  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Film adaptations
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Sheeran, Patrick F.
Informer.
Cork : Cork University Press in association with the Film Institute of Ireland, 2002
(OCoLC)606839061
Named Person: Liam O'Flaherty; Liam O'Flaherty; Arthur Robison; John Ford; Liam O'Flaherty; John Ford; Liam O'Flaherty; Arthur Robison
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Patrick F Sheeran
ISBN: 1859182887 9781859182888
OCLC Number: 48628451
Notes: Includes bibliographical references (p. 89-91).
Description: 91 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Contents: Mythogenesis --
Film into novel into film --
Arthur Robison's Informer --
The Ford-Nichols Informer --
Appendix: Narrative synopsis of Robison's Informer (1929) --
Credits.
Series Title: Ireland into film, 4.
Responsibility: Patrick F. Sheeran.

Abstract:

To date there have been four film versions of "The Informer". The hardman and the gunman have provided dramatists and film-makers with a compelling way of staging political conflict. This is a study  Read more...

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Review of the Ireland into Film series: "Each writer has also done an impressive amount of new archive research, which greatly enhances the series' value as fim history and film research. The volumes Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Liam O'Flaherty's novel The Informer (1925) is what the author of this study calls a 'mythogenic text', i.e. one that lends itself easily to adaptations, recreations and renditions. To date there have been four film versions (Arthur Robison 1929, John Ford 1935, Jules Dassin 1968, Michael Byrne 1992) and at least as many stage versions. One of the reasons the novel has proved so attractive to filmmakers is that it was itself written with an eye on the silent expressionist cinema of the day." "All too often O'Flaherty has been regarded as a hard realist who drew the great vigour of his art from the native Gaelic culture of oral storytelling. In fact, he was much more at home in the linked gestural and visual language of melodrama and the silent cinema. As this study amply demonstrates, the central antagonism between O'Flaherty's Hardman (Gypo Nolan) and the Gunman (Commandant Dan Gallagher) has provided dramatists and filmmakers with a compelling way of staging political conflict - not only in Ireland but in Weimar Germany and in the inner city ghettoes of Afro America as well. In this, his last critical work before his death, Pat Sheeran displays the particular blend of scholarship, wit and panache which characterized his life and career."--BOOK JACKET."
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