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Inner navigation : why we get lost and how we find our way

Author: Erik Jonsson
Publisher: New York : Scribner, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Why are we so often disoriented when we come up from the subway? Do we really walk in circles when we lose our bearings in the wilderness? How - and why - do we get lost at all?" "In this book, Erik Jonsson, a Swedish-born engineer who has spent a lifetime exploring navigation over every terrain, from the crowded cities of Europe to the emptiness of the desert, gives readers extraordinary new insights into the  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Jonsson, Erik, 1922-
Inner navigation.
New York : Scribner, c2002
(OCoLC)605017646
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Erik Jonsson
ISBN: 0743222067 9780743222068
OCLC Number: 48579029
Description: 347 p. : ill. ; 20 cm.
Contents: Starting out. Strange happenings. Cognitive maps. Designing a workable spatial system --
An introduction to cognitive maps --
The mentally invisible stop sign --
Who turned the Madeleine around? --
Finding cars in parking lots --
A backwoodsman goes to town --
Distance estimates in cognitive maps --
Pictures from an expedition --
The life of trails --
The role of landmarks in cognitive maps --
Crossing a field --
When the dead reckoning system slips. Digging up old stories and analyzing them. Adari way-finding in the Sahara --
The cognitive sun compass --
The cognitive wind compass --
Returning directly to the starting point --
Singing in the fog --
A report from a salty place [the Runn of Cutch] --
Try to go straight, but don't try too hard --
Strategies for walking in a straight line --
An old story from a cool place [Bear Islands, north of Siberia] --
Aboriginal and underwater way-finding. Walking in circles when lost. The Skogsnuva fairy tale [from Sweden] --
Going in a circle on the prairie --
Going astray in the Canadian and Swedish forests --
How come we walk in circles? Reversals of orientation. Forde's letter to the editor of Nature --
Strange morning awakenings --
When trains take off in the wrong direction --
Indoor misorientation --
Analyzing misorientations --
[Joseph] Peterson in a streetcar in Chicago --
Professor Peterson's misery in Minneapolis --
Tales of a cosmopolitan lady [Franziska Baumgarten] --
The topsy-turvy globe-trotter [A. Kirschmann] --
Causes of misorientation --
The San Francisco effect --
Crossing a ridge without getting to the other side --
Deterioration in our spatial system in old age --
Spatial memory slips causing reversals --
The role of gestalt in misorientations --
Do humans have a magnetic sense? --
Summing up and looking ahead.
Responsibility: Erik Jonsson.
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Abstract:

"Why are we so often disoriented when we come up from the subway? Do we really walk in circles when we lose our bearings in the wilderness? How - and why - do we get lost at all?" "In this book, Erik Jonsson, a Swedish-born engineer who has spent a lifetime exploring navigation over every terrain, from the crowded cities of Europe to the emptiness of the desert, gives readers extraordinary new insights into the human way-finding system." "Written for the nonscientist, Inner Navigation explains the array of physical and psychological cues the brain uses to situate us in space and build its "cognitive maps" - the subconscious maps it employs to organize landmarks. Humans, Jonsson explains, also possess an intuitive direction frame - an internal compass - that keeps these maps oriented (when it functions properly) and a dead-reckoning system that constantly updates our location on the map as we move through the world. Even the most cynical city-dweller will be amazed to learn how much of this innate sense we use every day as we travel across town or around the world."--BOOK JACKET.

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