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Inside the factory. Series 2, Crisps

Author: Sam Bailey; George Hughes; Emma Pound; British Broadcasting Corporation,
Publisher: [London, England] : British Broadcasting Corporation, 2016.
Edition/Format:   eVideo : Clipart/images/graphics : English
Summary:
With exclusive access to some of the world's biggest and busiest factories - some opening their doors to TV cameras for the very first time - Inside the Factory reveals the extraordinary secrets of our favorite consumer goods. Gregg Wallace discovers the astonishing machinery and processes that allow these supersized factories to produce the food and goods we buy, meeting the people who work there and watching raw  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Documentary television programs
History
Material Type: Clipart/images/graphics, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Sam Bailey; George Hughes; Emma Pound; British Broadcasting Corporation,
OCLC Number: 1000277222
Language Note: In English.
Notes: Title from resource description page (viewed July 20, 2017).
Performer(s): Presented by: Gregg Wallace, Cherry Healey, Ruth Goodman.
Description: 1 online resource (59 min.)
Responsibility: producer directors, George Hughes, Sam Bailey ; producer, Emma Pound ; series producer director, Chris Parkin ; BBC.

Abstract:

With exclusive access to some of the world's biggest and busiest factories - some opening their doors to TV cameras for the very first time - Inside the Factory reveals the extraordinary secrets of our favorite consumer goods. Gregg Wallace discovers the astonishing machinery and processes that allow these supersized factories to produce the food and goods we buy, meeting the people who work there and watching raw ingredients transformed into precision-engineered products. In this second series, Gregg reveals the processes behind the production of well-known brands of cereals, sweets, potato snacks, tinned beans, bicycles and sneakers. Gregg Wallace follows 27 tonnes of potatoes from a farm in Hampshire through the largest crisp factory on earth, as they are peeled, sliced and fried to make more than five million packets of crisps every 24 hours. Once the crisps are flavored, they are put into bags in one of the craziest rooms Gregg has ever seen, with over 100 machines that can fill hundreds of thousands of bags every hour. Gregg discovers how each bag is filled with nitrogen to keep the crisps from going stale and how they are distributed all over the UK - and even as far as the Costa del Sol to satisfy the local expats. Meanwhile, Cherry Healey discovers the secrets of perfect crisp potatoes which are special varieties grown exclusively to make crisps, as well the surprising ways that our brain can be tricked into thinking a crisp is much crunchier than it really is. She also finds out how more than a third of savory snacks consumed in the UK are made from corn and follows the production of Monster Munch, where the factory transforms 96 tonnes of corn into 12 million monster feet every single day. And historian Ruth Goodman investigates who really invented the crisp - was it the Americans, as is often cited, or the British? Ruth cooks up the earliest known recipe for crisps to uncover the truth. She also discovers how crisp wars between crisp manufacturers erupted in the 1960's and how in the 1980's, they tried to woo customers with strange innovations such as hedgehog crisps. Their determination fueled our demand, and today we get through over a half a billion crisps every 24 hours.

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Linked Data


Primary Entity

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