skip to content
Interview with Ben Belitt Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Interview with Ben Belitt

Author: Ben Belitt; David Sears
Publisher: 1985.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Disc 1 (ca. 47 min.). Ben Belitt speaks about Arch Lauterer as his mentor, including Lauterer's introducing him to German design and to Hanya Holm and her work [interruption]; Belitt's preference for Martha Graham's choreography over Holm's; spending the summer [in 1939] at Mills College; returning to Bennington College and working on Lauterer's dance-drama The bridge; working on dance productions at Bennington
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Ben Belitt; Arch Lauterer; Martha Graham; Ben Belitt; Martha Graham; Arch Lauterer
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Ben Belitt; David Sears
OCLC Number: 78271394
Notes: Interview with Ben Belitt conducted by David Sears on July 7, 1985, possibly in New York Cit.
The recording is occasionally marred by extraneous noise, particularly during the first ca. 2 min.
Description: 4 sound discs (ca. 187 min.) : digital ; 4 3/4 in.

Abstract:

Disc 1 (ca. 47 min.). Ben Belitt speaks about Arch Lauterer as his mentor, including Lauterer's introducing him to German design and to Hanya Holm and her work [interruption]; Belitt's preference for Martha Graham's choreography over Holm's; spending the summer [in 1939] at Mills College; returning to Bennington College and working on Lauterer's dance-drama The bridge; working on dance productions at Bennington College; Graham's work, American document; the integration of text with choreography; Lauterer's approach to set design; the shaping of stage space and the influence of [Adolphe] Appia; Jean Erdman's performance as the Lady in white in Graham's Letter to the world; compares the style of Emily Dickinson's poetry with the style of Graham's choreography; the significance of the title of Graham's work Errand into the maze.

Disc 2 (ca. 47 min.). Belitt continues to speak about the significance of the title Errand into the maze, in particular the concept of the labyrinth; the origin of the title in a poem Belitt dedicated to Graham; the meaning of T.S. Eliot's phrase "at the still point the dance is", including the function of stillness in dance; his interpretation of the word maze; more on stillness and dance; the concept of wilderness compared to that of the maze; the maze in poetry; Graham's monomaniacal [or monomythical] treatment of characters such as the Witch of Endor and Medea; Joseph Campbell, James Frazier and their focus on the monomyth; the images of the desert and of Jacob's ladder Belitt found in Graham's then-unfinished work Diversion of angels; his contribution of the initial title, Wilderness stair; the reason for the change in title; more on the significance of the wilderness [ends abruptly].

Disc 3 (ca. 48 min.). [Continues with Belitt speaking about the wilderness.] Graham's conceptions of Clytemnestra and the Witch of Endor; the concept of the king in the Bible and the problem of the double Messiah; the source and significance of the title of the Graham dance Canticle for innocent comedians; Graham's ignoring of Belitt's advice regarding the nature of the characters Clytemnestra and the Witch of Endor; the dichotomy of will (or control) and imagination in the artist; Graham as the very personification of the Witch [of Endor] and Medea; forgiveness as a central theme in Graham's [later?] dances; the importance of accepting unresolved questions; the relationship of this idea to the concept of depth in art as well as the concepts of the maze and of stillness; stillness, empty space, and the dance [ends abruptly].

Disc 4 (ca. 45 min.). Stillness and control in Graham's dance Primitive mysteries; Graham's use of literary sources in her work, especially poetry; his opinions regarding the correct relationship of text and choreography, using examples from Letter to the world, Jean Erdman's The coach with the six insides, Doris Humphrey's Lament for [Ignacio Sánchez Mejías], Valerie Bettis's As I lay dying and Desperate heart, and Graham's American document, The owl and the pussycat, and The Punch and the Judy [interruption]; working with dancers at Connecticut College on the use of poetry in dance; more, in general terms, on the use of poetry in dance; more on his work at Connecticut College; more on Bettis and As I lay dying; his own poetry; his personal and professional relationship with Graham, including their first meeting at Bennington College and her working methods; more on the use of literature in dance.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/78271394>
library:oclcnum"78271394"
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/78271394>
rdf:typej.1:Compact_Disc
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typej.1:Audiobook
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1388577>
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:name"Errand into the maze (Choreographic work : Graham)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1386571>
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:name"Letter to the world (Choreographic work : Graham)"
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1985"
schema:description"Disc 3 (ca. 48 min.). [Continues with Belitt speaking about the wilderness.] Graham's conceptions of Clytemnestra and the Witch of Endor; the concept of the king in the Bible and the problem of the double Messiah; the source and significance of the title of the Graham dance Canticle for innocent comedians; Graham's ignoring of Belitt's advice regarding the nature of the characters Clytemnestra and the Witch of Endor; the dichotomy of will (or control) and imagination in the artist; Graham as the very personification of the Witch [of Endor] and Medea; forgiveness as a central theme in Graham's [later?] dances; the importance of accepting unresolved questions; the relationship of this idea to the concept of depth in art as well as the concepts of the maze and of stillness; stillness, empty space, and the dance [ends abruptly]."@en
schema:description"Disc 2 (ca. 47 min.). Belitt continues to speak about the significance of the title Errand into the maze, in particular the concept of the labyrinth; the origin of the title in a poem Belitt dedicated to Graham; the meaning of T.S. Eliot's phrase "at the still point the dance is", including the function of stillness in dance; his interpretation of the word maze; more on stillness and dance; the concept of wilderness compared to that of the maze; the maze in poetry; Graham's monomaniacal [or monomythical] treatment of characters such as the Witch of Endor and Medea; Joseph Campbell, James Frazier and their focus on the monomyth; the images of the desert and of Jacob's ladder Belitt found in Graham's then-unfinished work Diversion of angels; his contribution of the initial title, Wilderness stair; the reason for the change in title; more on the significance of the wilderness [ends abruptly]."@en
schema:description"Disc 1 (ca. 47 min.). Ben Belitt speaks about Arch Lauterer as his mentor, including Lauterer's introducing him to German design and to Hanya Holm and her work [interruption]; Belitt's preference for Martha Graham's choreography over Holm's; spending the summer [in 1939] at Mills College; returning to Bennington College and working on Lauterer's dance-drama The bridge; working on dance productions at Bennington College; Graham's work, American document; the integration of text with choreography; Lauterer's approach to set design; the shaping of stage space and the influence of [Adolphe] Appia; Jean Erdman's performance as the Lady in white in Graham's Letter to the world; compares the style of Emily Dickinson's poetry with the style of Graham's choreography; the significance of the title of Graham's work Errand into the maze."@en
schema:description"Disc 4 (ca. 45 min.). Stillness and control in Graham's dance Primitive mysteries; Graham's use of literary sources in her work, especially poetry; his opinions regarding the correct relationship of text and choreography, using examples from Letter to the world, Jean Erdman's The coach with the six insides, Doris Humphrey's Lament for [Ignacio Sánchez Mejías], Valerie Bettis's As I lay dying and Desperate heart, and Graham's American document, The owl and the pussycat, and The Punch and the Judy [interruption]; working with dancers at Connecticut College on the use of poetry in dance; more, in general terms, on the use of poetry in dance; more on his work at Connecticut College; more on Bettis and As I lay dying; his own poetry; his personal and professional relationship with Graham, including their first meeting at Bennington College and her working methods; more on the use of literature in dance."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/63708131>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Interview with Ben Belitt"@en
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.