skip to content
Interview with Gertrude Shurr Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Interview with Gertrude Shurr

Author: Gertrude Shurr; Don McDonagh
Publisher: 1972.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Part 1, disc 1 (ca. 31 min.). Gertrude Shurr speaks with Don McDonagh about Martha Graham, and the distance she created between herself and the dancers; Graham's ability to small talk, but never to speak personally with the dancers; the fact that Erick Hawkins brought out a deeper side to Graham; Louis Horst introducing Graham to music and art, especially European music and art; the fact that Horst would encourage
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Interviews
Named Person: Gertrude Shurr; Martha Graham; Louis Horst; Doris Humphrey; Ted Shawn; Erick Hawkins; Charles Weidman; May O'Donnell; Ruth St Denis; Martha Graham; Erick Hawkins; Louis Horst; Doris Humphrey; May O'Donnell; Ted Shawn; Gertrude Shurr; Ruth St Denis; Charles Weidman
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Gertrude Shurr; Don McDonagh
OCLC Number: 262556964
Notes: Interview with Gertrude Shurr conducted by Don McDonagh on Dec. 8, 1972.
Each disc ends abruptly.
Description: 4 sound discs (ca. 94 min.) : digital, stereo ; 4 3/4 in.

Abstract:

Part 1, disc 1 (ca. 31 min.). Gertrude Shurr speaks with Don McDonagh about Martha Graham, and the distance she created between herself and the dancers; Graham's ability to small talk, but never to speak personally with the dancers; the fact that Erick Hawkins brought out a deeper side to Graham; Louis Horst introducing Graham to music and art, especially European music and art; the fact that Horst would encourage Graham and other dancers to read books from Germany, France, etc. in order to broaden their cultural awareness; the first Graham company, and how it consisted of strong soloists; being introduced to museums; the pre-classic forms, and drawing inspiration from sculpture and paintings; Horst introducing American Indian artifacts to Graham; the experience of working on Primitive mysteries; anecdotes of working with Graham, especially focusing on Graham's human side; Graham's drive and ambition; Graham's interest in reading and learning, drawing inspiration from a variety of ideas, people, and movements; the relationship of music to dance, one that provided the catalyst for modern dance and modern music coupling; Graham's professional relationships with composers; Celebration, and the music scored by Horst; Graham's inability to teach Denishawn dances because of licensing issues; teaching for Denishawn while the company toured; her relationship with Ruth St. Denis and Charles Weidman; Graham's dancing abilities; meeting Graham while working for Denishawn; Graham's early students, and attending classes twice a week; leaving Denishawn with Doris Humphrey and Charles Weidman, and then leaving those dancers to join Graham's company; Doris Humphrey's reaction to Shurr leaving to join Graham.

Part 1, disc 2 (ca. 31 min.). Gertrude Shurr continues to speak with Don McDonagh about Doris Humphrey; dancing for Graham for one year in order to prove her loyalty before being asked to join the company; dancing in Graham's early works, including Heretic and Primitive mysteries; the financial situation Graham and Louis Horst faced; learning dance techniques while at Denishawn; Graham's dance instincts; Charles Weidman's dance techniques; floor exercises at Graham's studio; the strength of Graham's dances involving back and pelvis movement, as well as breath techniques; her belief that Graham was a genius, and the central figure in modern dance through her discovery of body movement and presentation.

Part 2, disc 1 (ca. 31 min.). Gertrude Shurr speaks with Don McDonagh about the difference between early Graham dancers and those who came later; earlier dancers' attachment to Graham and the dances; her lack of understanding of how modern dancers shop around for teachers; rehearsals with the Graham company, and preparing for performances; attending all classes offered by Graham; her intense love and understanding of Graham's dances; her relationship with May O'Donnell, and O'Donnell's dance company in the 1970s, O'Donnell's reputation and the dance, Suspension; Jane Dudley's current work, and working in London; Robert Powell's connection to Graham; falling out of touch with Graham; Graham's fear that her dances, if performed on the surface without the original intent and emotion, would be caricatures of her, and her work; Graham's interest in reading; Erick Hawkins' introducing Graham to Greek tragedies.

Part 2, disc 2 (ca. 31 min). Gertrude Shurr speaks with Don McDonagh about Martha Graham's theatrics, and her influence on modern dance lighting and staging; Graham's costuming influences; the derivative aspects in Graham's work reveals the time spent with Ruth St. Denis; Ted Shawn's statement about Jewish dancers, and the effect that had on the Denishawn dancers; taking classes from Louis for 8 years; the first ten years dancing in Graham's company; the World Fair of 1938, and dancing in the preview there with music written by Ray Green; touring with the Graham company; an anecdote when Shurr picked an orange from Graham's mother's yard, and brought it to N.Y. from Calif.; visits made to N.Y. by Graham's mother; her belief that Graham did not understand how great the works were; Graham's ability to generate a light from within.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/262556964>
library:oclcnum"262556964"
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typebgn:CD
rdf:valueUnknown value: nsr
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1386569>
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:name"Primitive mysteries (Choreographic work : Graham)"
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/140012982>
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Martha Graham School of Contemporary Dance."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:bookFormatbgn:AudioBook
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1972"
schema:description"Part 2, disc 1 (ca. 31 min.). Gertrude Shurr speaks with Don McDonagh about the difference between early Graham dancers and those who came later; earlier dancers' attachment to Graham and the dances; her lack of understanding of how modern dancers shop around for teachers; rehearsals with the Graham company, and preparing for performances; attending all classes offered by Graham; her intense love and understanding of Graham's dances; her relationship with May O'Donnell, and O'Donnell's dance company in the 1970s, O'Donnell's reputation and the dance, Suspension; Jane Dudley's current work, and working in London; Robert Powell's connection to Graham; falling out of touch with Graham; Graham's fear that her dances, if performed on the surface without the original intent and emotion, would be caricatures of her, and her work; Graham's interest in reading; Erick Hawkins' introducing Graham to Greek tragedies."@en
schema:description"Part 1, disc 2 (ca. 31 min.). Gertrude Shurr continues to speak with Don McDonagh about Doris Humphrey; dancing for Graham for one year in order to prove her loyalty before being asked to join the company; dancing in Graham's early works, including Heretic and Primitive mysteries; the financial situation Graham and Louis Horst faced; learning dance techniques while at Denishawn; Graham's dance instincts; Charles Weidman's dance techniques; floor exercises at Graham's studio; the strength of Graham's dances involving back and pelvis movement, as well as breath techniques; her belief that Graham was a genius, and the central figure in modern dance through her discovery of body movement and presentation."@en
schema:description"Part 1, disc 1 (ca. 31 min.). Gertrude Shurr speaks with Don McDonagh about Martha Graham, and the distance she created between herself and the dancers; Graham's ability to small talk, but never to speak personally with the dancers; the fact that Erick Hawkins brought out a deeper side to Graham; Louis Horst introducing Graham to music and art, especially European music and art; the fact that Horst would encourage Graham and other dancers to read books from Germany, France, etc. in order to broaden their cultural awareness; the first Graham company, and how it consisted of strong soloists; being introduced to museums; the pre-classic forms, and drawing inspiration from sculpture and paintings; Horst introducing American Indian artifacts to Graham; the experience of working on Primitive mysteries; anecdotes of working with Graham, especially focusing on Graham's human side; Graham's drive and ambition; Graham's interest in reading and learning, drawing inspiration from a variety of ideas, people, and movements; the relationship of music to dance, one that provided the catalyst for modern dance and modern music coupling; Graham's professional relationships with composers; Celebration, and the music scored by Horst; Graham's inability to teach Denishawn dances because of licensing issues; teaching for Denishawn while the company toured; her relationship with Ruth St. Denis and Charles Weidman; Graham's dancing abilities; meeting Graham while working for Denishawn; Graham's early students, and attending classes twice a week; leaving Denishawn with Doris Humphrey and Charles Weidman, and then leaving those dancers to join Graham's company; Doris Humphrey's reaction to Shurr leaving to join Graham."@en
schema:description"Part 2, disc 2 (ca. 31 min). Gertrude Shurr speaks with Don McDonagh about Martha Graham's theatrics, and her influence on modern dance lighting and staging; Graham's costuming influences; the derivative aspects in Graham's work reveals the time spent with Ruth St. Denis; Ted Shawn's statement about Jewish dancers, and the effect that had on the Denishawn dancers; taking classes from Louis for 8 years; the first ten years dancing in Graham's company; the World Fair of 1938, and dancing in the preview there with music written by Ray Green; touring with the Graham company; an anecdote when Shurr picked an orange from Graham's mother's yard, and brought it to N.Y. from Calif.; visits made to N.Y. by Graham's mother; her belief that Graham did not understand how great the works were; Graham's ability to generate a light from within."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/14161963>
schema:genre"Interviews"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Interview with Gertrude Shurr"@en
schema:publication
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.