skip to content
Interview with James Waring Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Interview with James Waring

Author: James Waring; Don McDonagh
Publisher: 1970.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Disc 1 (ca. 59 min.). James Waring speaks with Don McDonagh about the dancer Toby Armour; his early dance and composition training, including with Welland Lathrop; studying with Raoul Pause; observations regarding astrological signs and corresponding personality types, e.g., as in the case of Alwin Nikolais and Merce Cunningham [short gap]; his difficulty in finding male dancers; his efforts and ideas regarding
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: James Waring
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: James Waring; Don McDonagh
OCLC Number: 291091733
Notes: Interview with James Waring conducted by Don McDonagh on Feb. 17, 1970 in New York City.
Sound quality is good overall. The interviewee's voice is soft, and the recording is marred by occasional extraneous noise.
Description: 2 sound discs (ca. 105 min.): digital ; 4 3/4 in.

Abstract:

Disc 1 (ca. 59 min.). James Waring speaks with Don McDonagh about the dancer Toby Armour; his early dance and composition training, including with Welland Lathrop; studying with Raoul Pause; observations regarding astrological signs and corresponding personality types, e.g., as in the case of Alwin Nikolais and Merce Cunningham [short gap]; his difficulty in finding male dancers; his efforts and ideas regarding publicity, including reviews; Jean Erdman, as a choreographer; reasons for wearing a necktie [short gap]; briefly, serving on a panel with Lincoln Kirstein; Lar Lubovitch as a choreographer; George Balanchine's work Serenade; Waring's early works; his practice of dedicating a work to a particular person; ca. 1900 to the mid-1930s as a golden age for film and theater; Busby Berkeley; Dance Associates; more regarding the difficulties of obtaining adequate publicity, in particular for small companies; his dislike of presenting his work on a non-proscenium stage; his early works Adagietto and Fantasy and fugue in C major; reasons he stopped creating dances with a story [telephone rings; recording ends abruptly].

Disc 2 (ca. 46 min.). James Waring continues to speak with Don McDonagh about his early works, including his relationship with his dancers; his work Arena; his work Spookride version II; his use of ballet movements; the composer Richard Maxfield; his work Poet's vaudeville; Paul Taylor as a choreographer; Waring's work Phrases; how he finds his titles; his visual art background, including his making of collages and their influence on his choreography; more on the early part of his career including his participating in the Choreographers' Workshop; how he thinks the modern dance world may have viewed his early works; his attempt to make his work Humoresque as boring as possible [door bell rings; recording ends abruptly].

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Related Subjects:(1)

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/291091733>
library:oclcnum"291091733"
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/291091733>
rdf:typej.1:Compact_Disc
rdf:typej.1:Audiobook
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:name"Waring, James, 1922-1975"
schema:author
schema:contributor
schema:datePublished"1970"
schema:description"Disc 1 (ca. 59 min.). James Waring speaks with Don McDonagh about the dancer Toby Armour; his early dance and composition training, including with Welland Lathrop; studying with Raoul Pause; observations regarding astrological signs and corresponding personality types, e.g., as in the case of Alwin Nikolais and Merce Cunningham [short gap]; his difficulty in finding male dancers; his efforts and ideas regarding publicity, including reviews; Jean Erdman, as a choreographer; reasons for wearing a necktie [short gap]; briefly, serving on a panel with Lincoln Kirstein; Lar Lubovitch as a choreographer; George Balanchine's work Serenade; Waring's early works; his practice of dedicating a work to a particular person; ca. 1900 to the mid-1930s as a golden age for film and theater; Busby Berkeley; Dance Associates; more regarding the difficulties of obtaining adequate publicity, in particular for small companies; his dislike of presenting his work on a non-proscenium stage; his early works Adagietto and Fantasy and fugue in C major; reasons he stopped creating dances with a story [telephone rings; recording ends abruptly]."
schema:description"Disc 2 (ca. 46 min.). James Waring continues to speak with Don McDonagh about his early works, including his relationship with his dancers; his work Arena; his work Spookride version II; his use of ballet movements; the composer Richard Maxfield; his work Poet's vaudeville; Paul Taylor as a choreographer; Waring's work Phrases; how he finds his titles; his visual art background, including his making of collages and their influence on his choreography; more on the early part of his career including his participating in the Choreographers' Workshop; how he thinks the modern dance world may have viewed his early works; his attempt to make his work Humoresque as boring as possible [door bell rings; recording ends abruptly]."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/45315831>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Interview with James Waring"

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.