skip to content
Interview with Jerome Robbins Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Interview with Jerome Robbins

Author: Jerome Robbins; Don McDonagh
Publisher: 1981.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Jerome Robbins speaks with Don McDonagh about the problems with filming dance for television, in particular its cost, as for example, in the filming of his work Other dances; the difficulty of finding camera operators experienced in shooting dance; the inherent limitations of film to capture the energy of a dance performance; creative impasse as the most frustrating aspect of choreographing and George Balanchine's  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Jerome Robbins
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Jerome Robbins; Don McDonagh
OCLC Number: 316798933
Notes: Interview with Jerome Robbins conducted by Don McDonagh on Jan. 27, 1981 in New York City.
Description: 1 sound disc (ca. 48 min.): digital ; 4 3/4 in.

Abstract:

Jerome Robbins speaks with Don McDonagh about the problems with filming dance for television, in particular its cost, as for example, in the filming of his work Other dances; the difficulty of finding camera operators experienced in shooting dance; the inherent limitations of film to capture the energy of a dance performance; creative impasse as the most frustrating aspect of choreographing and George Balanchine's advice as to how to get through it; practical problems with filming dance, including the frequent interruptions that inevitably ocurr; the changes in the way his ballet Dances at a gathering has been performed since he created it; the problem of authenticity when performing works created in the past, with his experience of dancing in Vitale Fokine's version of Schéhérazade as an example; more on the inherent difference between the viewpoint of the live spectator and that of the television watcher; where the cameras should be placed; more on his working methods, including his extensive preparation before entering the studio; Edwin Denby as a critic who can cause him to take another look at both his own and others' works; factors that can affect one's perception of a ballet, including the audience's mood and the costumes; the fact that none of his filmed-for-television ballets were created for the camera; attempts to describe, in response to McDonagh's question, what constitutes a choreographic idea; an anecdote about the choreographing of his work The Goldberg variations; his view that the televison series Dance in America [WNET/Thirteen's Great performances: Dance in America series] does not adequately compensate choreographers; tells an anecdote about his father to illustrate the general public's lack of understanding as to what choreographers do [ends abruptly].

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/316798933>
library:oclcnum"316798933"
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/316798933>
rdf:typeschema:Book
rdf:typej.1:Compact_Disc
rdf:typej.1:Audiobook
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1385101>
rdf:typeschema:CreativeWork
schema:name"Dances at a gathering (Choreographic work : Robbins)"
schema:contributor
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1981"
schema:description"Jerome Robbins speaks with Don McDonagh about the problems with filming dance for television, in particular its cost, as for example, in the filming of his work Other dances; the difficulty of finding camera operators experienced in shooting dance; the inherent limitations of film to capture the energy of a dance performance; creative impasse as the most frustrating aspect of choreographing and George Balanchine's advice as to how to get through it; practical problems with filming dance, including the frequent interruptions that inevitably ocurr; the changes in the way his ballet Dances at a gathering has been performed since he created it; the problem of authenticity when performing works created in the past, with his experience of dancing in Vitale Fokine's version of Schéhérazade as an example; more on the inherent difference between the viewpoint of the live spectator and that of the television watcher; where the cameras should be placed; more on his working methods, including his extensive preparation before entering the studio; Edwin Denby as a critic who can cause him to take another look at both his own and others' works; factors that can affect one's perception of a ballet, including the audience's mood and the costumes; the fact that none of his filmed-for-television ballets were created for the camera; attempts to describe, in response to McDonagh's question, what constitutes a choreographic idea; an anecdote about the choreographing of his work The Goldberg variations; his view that the televison series Dance in America [WNET/Thirteen's Great performances: Dance in America series] does not adequately compensate choreographers; tells an anecdote about his father to illustrate the general public's lack of understanding as to what choreographers do [ends abruptly]."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1151824349>
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Interview with Jerome Robbins"
schema:url

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.