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Interview with Lionel Loueke

Autor: Lionel LouekeMark RuffinAmerican School of Modern Music.Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz.Berklee College of Music.Todos autores
Editorial: 2008.
Serie: Duke jazz histories.
Edición/Formato:   Video DVD : Inglés (eng)
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
Lionel Loueke speaks with Mark Ruffin about starting to play guitar late (age 17) and accomplishing a lot by age 35; growing up in Benin, Africa; playing percussion from ages 9-15 and beginning guitar at 17; Nigeria as music center in Africa; Benin music scene in comparison to West Africa; how learning guitar led to listening to blues artists like B.B. King, Wes Montgomery, Tal Farlow; transcribing music by ear  Leer más
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Detalles

Género/Forma: Interviews
Persona designada: Lionel Loueke; Herbie Hancock; Wes Montgomery; Terence Blanchard; B B King
Tipo de material: Grabación de video
Tipo de documento: Material visual
Todos autores / colaboradores: Lionel Loueke; Mark Ruffin; American School of Modern Music.; Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz.; Berklee College of Music.; Jazz at Lincoln Center (Organization)
Número OCLC: 313456001
Notas: Interview with Lionel Loueke conducted by Mark Ruffin, in New York, N.Y., on Dec. 15, 2008.
Notas de producción: This interview was videotaped at the Oral History Studio of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts in New York City on December 15, 2008, by Penny Ward.
Descripción: 1 videodisc (60 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Detalles: DVD.
Título de la serie: Duke jazz histories.

Resumen:

Lionel Loueke speaks with Mark Ruffin about starting to play guitar late (age 17) and accomplishing a lot by age 35; growing up in Benin, Africa; playing percussion from ages 9-15 and beginning guitar at 17; Nigeria as music center in Africa; Benin music scene in comparison to West Africa; how learning guitar led to listening to blues artists like B.B. King, Wes Montgomery, Tal Farlow; transcribing music by ear using cassette tapes to learn; how it was not easy to find music; trying to transcribe and learn everything with no help or formal training; how his identity as a musician came with teaching himself; the National Institute of Art on the Ivory Coast; using the Institute as his first step to playing jazz in the United States; going to Paris to play music; finding other African musicians to relate to in Paris; changing over from classical to jazz; attending the American School of Modern Music in Paris; getting a scholarship to attend the Berklee College of Music in Boston; how Paris was the beginning of his dream coming true; how Paris gave him access to music stores to buy books, records or even strings; having to use bicycle brake cables as strings in Africa; seeing live music for the first time; meeting Richard Bona as a boy in Benin, and seeing him again in Paris; Wes Montgomery as his main influence; his time at the Berklee College of Music in Boston; being shocked by young talent at Berklee; feeling ready musically but challenged by his language barrier; the high number of guitarists studying at Berklee; how professors did not always appreciate how he played in his own style; his friendship and playing with John Scofield after having transcribed his work and studying him in his youth; auditioning for the Thelonious Monk Institute in 2001 - having to play for Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter and Terence Blanchard; Herbie Hancock hearing his tape and sticking up for him; staying true to his own style and musical identity; being asked to play on "Footprints"; getting a call from Robert Sadin while on vacation saying Wayne Shorter wanted him on his next record; how auditioning for the Monk Institute changed everything; working on "Flow" with Terence Blanchard and Herbie Hancock; developing his vocalizing and how that technique keeps growing and changing; using vocalizing as its own language - an extension of his guitar playing; how he felt after getting a positive reaction to "Flow"; how hard it is to find a good band leader; Terence Blanchard having great concepts; everyone on "Flow" doing their own thing; moving to New York City in 2003 and getting called about playing with Herbie Hancock in 2004; his trio Gilfema with Frank Nemeth and Massimo Biolcati; the Oblique Sound label; playing on "Possibilities"; arranging "Sister Moon" and Sting's reaction to that arrangement; the "River: The Joni Letters" project as something different happening, and the concept of recording based on lyrics; concentrating on how to play the compliment of what was being played around him; Herbie Hancock winning the Grammy for album of the year; his contract with Blue Note; growing as an artist with each record; Herbie Hancock as mentor (in business, in music, and in spirit); what is next for him - writing, growing, always trying to be better and different; preferring to keep learning with Herbie and playing with him for as long as possible; the importance of listening and not playing unless he really means what he is going to play; not aiming to be a star, but to keep growing as a musician.

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Datos enlazados


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