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Interview with Ron K. Brown

Author: Ronald K Brown; Pamela Green; Jennifer Muller; Evidence Dance Company.
Publisher: 2008.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio   Archival Material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Ron K. Brown speaks with Pamela Green about his early dance background, growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y.; at 12 years of age he planned to attend a Dance Theatre of Harlem audition when his mother went into labor, preventing him from pursuing dance at that time; instead, he focused energy on journalism in high school, receiving a scholarship to St. Michael's College in Vermont; however, during the summer of his 16th
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Details

Genre/Form: Interviews
Named Person: Ronald K Brown; Jennifer Muller; Mary Anthony
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Ronald K Brown; Pamela Green; Jennifer Muller; Evidence Dance Company.
OCLC Number: 244571449
Notes: Interview with Ron K. Brown conducted by Pamela Green at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, New York, N.Y., on June 17, 2008.
Description: 2 sound discs (ca. 93 min.) : digital, stereo ; 4 3/4 in. + transcript (41 leaves)

Abstract:

Ron K. Brown speaks with Pamela Green about his early dance background, growing up in Brooklyn, N.Y.; at 12 years of age he planned to attend a Dance Theatre of Harlem audition when his mother went into labor, preventing him from pursuing dance at that time; instead, he focused energy on journalism in high school, receiving a scholarship to St. Michael's College in Vermont; however, during the summer of his 16th year, began taking classes at Mary Anthony's dance studio in Manhattan and re-focused his energy on dance; decided to pursue dance, studying with Mary Anthony during the day while working for J.P. Morgan at night; began a scholarship with Jennifer Muller when he was 18, joining the company shortly after; discovered the facility of his body in Muller's classes; both Mary Anthony's and Jennifer Muller's studios gave Brown a sense of home and family, and he was encouraged to explore dances whereby he could define his identity and uncover the nuances of human connections. Through his choreography, Brown combines intense physicality with social commentary.

Ron K. Brown speaks with Pamela Green about starting a dance company, after being instructed by various mentors to tell the stories of his grandparents; started company, Evidence, in order to represent his family and his ancestoral legacy. Brown discusses inspirations found in other dancers' work (such as Alvin Ailey), poets (such as Craig Harris), singers (such as Nina Simone), writers (such as Nikki Giovanni and Essex Hemphill). Brown explores various themes in his work, such as spirituality, loss, identity, racial and class issues, same-sex love, community, and family. Brown explains the process through which he choreographs, explaining that the dances originate as ideas that are then worked out on the dancers while in the studio, using movement as a resource for shaping the ideas into contextualized pieces. Brown discusses the importance of having a dance company in which the dancers are given the space to truly invest in the work, saying that he has been blessed with dancers with whom he has deep connections. Brown discusses many of his choreographic works, including Walking out the dark, Dirt road, Combat review, Come ye, and others. Brown explains his spirituality and an ever-present connection to God; explains how his teaching and experience in Cote d'Ivoire, learning traditional African dance, and later, Afro-Cuban dance in Cuba, have reshaped the direction his choreography has taken, allowing him to use the language of traditional dance forms within a contemporary context. Brown discusses his experience as an African American male and the inevitability that the experience informs his choreography and creative process. Brown discusses current dances, such as One shot, and projects plans for future works; indicates his desire to work creatively with the musician and songwriter, Stevie Wonder.

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Linked Data


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