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An intimate history of humanity

Author: Theodore Zeldin
Publisher: New York : HarperCollins Publishers, [1995]
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st U.S. edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Zeldin studies the problems of modern society in light of demonstrating how individuals pay attention to, or ignore, the experience of previous generations and cultures. Some of his examples are how people have acquired immunity to loneliness, how older fears give rise to new fears, and why people choose a way of life and what they do when it does not wholly satisfy them.
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Zeldin, Theodore, 1933-
Intimate history of humanity.
New York : HarperCollins Publishers, [1995]
(OCoLC)624595805
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Theodore Zeldin
ISBN: 006017160X 9780060171605
OCLC Number: 31288969
Notes: "Originally published in Great Britain in 1994 by Sinclair-Stevenson"--T.p. verso.
Description: vii, 488 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. How humans have repeatedly lost hope, and how new encounters, and a new pair of spectacles, revive them --
2. How men and women have slowly learned to have interesting conversations --
3. How people searching for their roots are only beginning to look far and deep enough --
4. How some people have acquired an immunity to loneliness --
5. How new forms of love have been invented --
6. Why there has been more progress in cooking than in sex --
7. How the desire that men feel for women, and for other men, has altered through the centuries --
8. How respect has become more desirable than power --
9. How those who want neither to give orders nor to receive them can become intermediaries --
10. How people have freed themselves from fear by finding new fears --
11. How curiosity has become the key to freedom --
12. Why it has become increasingly difficult to destroy one's enemies --
13. How the art of escaping from one's troubles has developed, but not the art of knowing where to escape to.
Responsibility: Theodore Zeldin.
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Abstract:

Zeldin studies the problems of modern society in light of demonstrating how individuals pay attention to, or ignore, the experience of previous generations and cultures. Some of his examples are how people have acquired immunity to loneliness, how older fears give rise to new fears, and why people choose a way of life and what they do when it does not wholly satisfy them.

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