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Introduction to Kant's Anthropology

Author: Michel Foucault; Roberto Nigro
Publisher: Los Angeles, CA : Semiotext(e), ©2008.
Series: Semiotext(e) foreign agents series.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In his critical interpretation of Kant's Anthropology, Michel Foucault warns against the dangers of treating psychology as a new metaphysics. Instead, he explores the possibility of studying man empirically as he is affected by time, art and technique, self-perception, and language. If man is both the condition for knowledge and its ultimate object, any empirical knowledge of man is inextricably tied up with  Read more...
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Named Person: Immanuel Kant; Immanuel Kant
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michel Foucault; Roberto Nigro
ISBN: 9781584350545 1584350547
OCLC Number: 153578160
Language Note: Translated from the French.
Description: 157 pages ; 23 cm.
Contents: Introduction to Kant's Anthropology.
Series Title: Semiotext(e) foreign agents series.
Other Titles: Introduction à l'"anthropologie" de Kant.
Responsibility: Michel Foucault ; edited, with an afterword and critical notes, by Roberto Nigro ; translated by Roberto Nigro and Kate Briggs.

Abstract:

"In his critical interpretation of Kant's Anthropology, Michel Foucault warns against the dangers of treating psychology as a new metaphysics. Instead, he explores the possibility of studying man empirically as he is affected by time, art and technique, self-perception, and language. If man is both the condition for knowledge and its ultimate object, any empirical knowledge of man is inextricably tied up with language. Far from being a study of self-consciousness, anthropology is a way of questioning the limits of human knowledge and concrete existence." "Long unknown to Foucault readers, this text offers the first outline of what would later become Foucault's own frame of reference within the history of philosophy. Standing at a crossroad of his ouevre, it allows us to look back on Madness and Civilization while it sketches out the relationship between discourse and truth developed in The Order of Things. This "introduction" finally announces what will be considered the most scandalous aspect of Foucault's thought: the death of man, but also the joyous advent of the Ubermensch, the philosopher-artist capable of creating vital values."--Jacket.

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