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The Invisible Origins of Legal Positivism : a Re-Reading of a Tradition

Author: William E Conklin
Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer Netherlands, 2001.
Series: Law and philosophy library, 52.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Conklin's thesis is that the tradition of modern legal positivism, beginning with Thomas Hobbes, postulated different senses of the invisible as the authorising origin of humanly posited laws. Conklin re-reads the tradition by privileging how the canons share a particular understanding of legal language as written. Leading philosophers who have espoused the tenets of the tradition have assumed that legal language is  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: William E Conklin
ISBN: 9789401008082 9401008086
OCLC Number: 851381473
Description: 1 online resource (368 pages).
Contents: One: The Positive Law/Natural Law Dichotomy, Aristotle and the Greek Totemic Culture --
1. The Rise of the Positive Law --
Natural Law Dichotomy --
2. The Constraint of the Positive Law --
Natural Law Dichotomy --
3. The Determinative Sense of Natural Laws --
4. The Exclusionary Character of the Nomos/Physis Dichotomy --
5. The Figurative Sense of Natural Laws --
6. The Laws of the Totemic Culture --
7. The Positive Law --
Natural Law Dichotomy as Suspect --
Two: Invisibility in Modern Legal Thought --
1. The Invisible Author --
2. The Invisible as an Inaccessible Immediacy --
3. The Invisible as an a priori Concept --
4. The Invisibility of the Absent Origin --
Three: The Tradition of Legal Positivism in Modern Legal Thought --
1. The Impersonality of Posited Laws --
2. Is there a Tradition of Legal Positivism? --
3. Three Inquiries --
4. The Authorizing Origin of Posited Rules/Norms --
5. The Problematic of Modem Legal Positivism --
Four: An Invisible Nature: The Origin of Thomas Hobbes's Civil Laws --
1. The Parado --
2. Why is Language Important? --
3. Nature as a Condition lacking a Shared Language --
4. The Actors of a Language --
5. The Problematic of Hobbes' Theory of Sovereignty --
6. The Natural Condition --
7. The Authority of Written Laws --
8. Legal Obligation --
9. The Mythology of Legal Authority --
10. The Invisible Origin of the Authority of Hobbes' Civil Laws --
11. The Forgotten Origin --
Five: Naming the Unnamable: Jean-Jacques Rousseau's General Will --
1. The Author as the General Will --
2. The Legislature --
3. Civil Laws as the Expression of the general will --
4. Naming the Unnamable --
Six: The Habits of the People: The Origin of John Austin's Laws Properly So Called --
1. The Problematic of Austin's Theory of Law --
2. Austin's Commentators --
3. The Excise of the Natural Condition from Civil Society --
4. The Historical Author --
5. Is the Historical Author's Authority Unlimited? --
6. The Inaccessibility of the Will of the People --
7. Austin's Inaccessible Arche --
8. Who are `the People'? --
9. The Spirit of `the People' --
Seven: The Invisible Origin of Legal Language: The Grundnorm --
1. The Impure Origin of the Structure --
2. An Hypothetical or a Catogorical Origin? --
3. The Origin as an a priori Concept --
4. The Invisible Origin of the Authority of Norms --
IChapter Eight: The Forgotten Origin: H.L.A. Hart's Sense of the Pre-Legal --
1. The Rule of Recognition --
2. The Immediacy and the Statement --
3. Examples of Hart's Distinction between Immediacy and Legal Statements --
4. Does the Authorizing Origin Pre-exist Primary Rules? --
5. Is the Authorizing Origin Internal to the Primary and Secondary Rules? --
6. Is the Authorizing Origin Accessible to Legal Officials? --
7. The Forgotten Origin --
Nine: Forgetting the Act of Forgetting: Raz's Inaccessible Origin of Legal Reasoning --
1. Experiential Bonding as the Origin of the Legal Structure --
2. The Official's Forgetting of the Experiential Origin --
3. The Legal Point of View --
4. The Unwritten Experiential Beliefs --
5. The Language of the Legal Point of View --
6. Violence and the Constitution of the Institutions --
7. The Idealism of Raz's Legal Reasoning --
8. Forgetting the Act of Forgetting --
Conclusion: The End of Legal Positivism --
1. The Finality of the Trace of Auctoritas --
2. The Invisible Origin --
3. The Violence of the Juridical Production of the Origin --
4. The Contradiction --
5. Forgetting the Origin --
6. The Crisis --
7. The End of a Tradition --
1. Primary Sources --
2. Secondary Sources.
Series Title: Law and philosophy library, 52.
Responsibility: by William E. Conklin.

Abstract:

Conklin's thesis is that the tradition of modern legal positivism, beginning with Thomas Hobbes, postulated different senses of the invisible as the authorising origin of humanly posited laws.  Read more...

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