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Iraq : the borrowed kettle

Author: Slavoj Žižek
Publisher: London ; New York : Verso, 2004.
Series: Wo es war.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In order to render the strange logic of dreams, Freud cited the old joke about the borrowed kettle: (1) I never borrowed a kettle from you, (2) I returned it to you intact, (3) the kettle was already broken when I got it from you. Such an enumeration of inconsistent arguments, of course, confirms exactly what it endeavors to deny - that I returned a broken kettle to you." "That same inconsistency, Zizek argues,  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Žižek, Slavoj.
Iraq.
London ; New York : Verso, 2004
(OCoLC)593414263
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Slavoj Žižek
ISBN: 1844670015 9781844670017
OCLC Number: 54503538
Description: 188 p. ; 20 cm.
Contents: They control Iraq, but do they control themselves? --
Non penis a pendendo --
The Iraqi MacGufin, the nation-state empire --
Europe, old and new, a tale of heroes and cowards --
Was will Europa? --
A modest proposal for an act in the Middle East --
The silent revolution --
Canis a non canendo --
The liberal fake, act, evil, and antigone --
Risking the step outside --
Too radical for democracy? --
L'inconscient, c'est la politique --
Utopia and the gentle art of killing --
Lucus a non lucendo --
Ethical violence? yes, please! --
The four discourses --
A cup of decaffeinated reality --
Innocent violence --
Of noble lies and bitter truths.
Series Title: Wo es war.
Responsibility: Slavoj Žižek.
More information:

Abstract:

"In order to render the strange logic of dreams, Freud cited the old joke about the borrowed kettle: (1) I never borrowed a kettle from you, (2) I returned it to you intact, (3) the kettle was already broken when I got it from you. Such an enumeration of inconsistent arguments, of course, confirms exactly what it endeavors to deny - that I returned a broken kettle to you." "That same inconsistency, Zizek argues, characterized the justification of the attack on Iraq, whereby a link between Saddam's regime and al-Qaeda was transformed into the threat posed by the regime to the region, which was then further transformed into the menace posed hanging over everyone (but the US and Britain especially) of weapons of mass destruction. When no significant weapons were actually found, we were treated to the same bizarre logic: OK, the two labs we found don't really prove anything, but even if there are no WMD in Iraq, there are other good reasons to topple a tyrant like Saddam." "Iraq: The Borrowed Kettle - a sequel to Zizek's Welcome to the Desert of the Real - analyzes the background that such inconsistent argumentation conceals and, simultaneously, cannot help but highlight: what were the actual ideological and political stakes of the attack on Iraq? In classic Zizekian style, it spares nothing and nobody, neither pathetically impotent pacifism nor hypocritical sympathy with the suffering of the Iraqi people."--Jacket.

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schema:reviewBody""In order to render the strange logic of dreams, Freud cited the old joke about the borrowed kettle: (1) I never borrowed a kettle from you, (2) I returned it to you intact, (3) the kettle was already broken when I got it from you. Such an enumeration of inconsistent arguments, of course, confirms exactly what it endeavors to deny - that I returned a broken kettle to you." "That same inconsistency, Zizek argues, characterized the justification of the attack on Iraq, whereby a link between Saddam's regime and al-Qaeda was transformed into the threat posed by the regime to the region, which was then further transformed into the menace posed hanging over everyone (but the US and Britain especially) of weapons of mass destruction. When no significant weapons were actually found, we were treated to the same bizarre logic: OK, the two labs we found don't really prove anything, but even if there are no WMD in Iraq, there are other good reasons to topple a tyrant like Saddam." "Iraq: The Borrowed Kettle - a sequel to Zizek's Welcome to the Desert of the Real - analyzes the background that such inconsistent argumentation conceals and, simultaneously, cannot help but highlight: what were the actual ideological and political stakes of the attack on Iraq? In classic Zizekian style, it spares nothing and nobody, neither pathetically impotent pacifism nor hypocritical sympathy with the suffering of the Iraqi people."--Jacket."
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