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The Irving Berlin reader

Author: Benjamin Sears
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, ©2012.
Series: Readers on American musicians.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Without any formal training in music composition, Irving Berlin took a knack for music and turned it into the most successful songwriting career in American history. Berlin was the first Tin Pan Alley songwriter to go uptown to Broadway with a complete musical score (Watch Your Step in 1914); he is the only songwriter to build a theater exclusively for his own work (The Music Box); and his name appears above the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Irving Berlin; Irving Berlin; Irving Berlin
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Benjamin Sears
ISBN: 9780195383744 0195383745
OCLC Number: 708648754
Description: xii, 219 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
Contents: Part I: Musical demon: Early years --
Ward Morehouse: A trip to Chinatown with Irving Berlin --
Rennold Wolf:: The boy who revived ragtime --
Edward Jablonski: "Alexander" and Irving --
Charles Hamm: Excerpt from Alexander and his band --
"Madam Critic": Review of watch you step --
Harry B. Smith: Excerpt from first nights and first editions --
Margaret Knapp: Watch your step: Irving Berlin's 1914 musical --
Ghost of Verdi interviewed: Tells how he suffered nightly --
Robert Baral: Fond memory: Those Music Box Revues --
Robert Benchley: Letter about the music box --
S.I. deKrafft: "Yes, we have no bananas" in grand opera setting --
Part II: Blue skies: Middle years --
George S. Kaufman: Memoir --
Letter from Jerome Kern to Alexander Woollcott, from the story of Irving Berlin --
Richard Rodgers: Excerpt from musical stages. Richard Barrios: Excerpt from chapter "The march of time" in a song in the dark --
Howard Pollack: Unity of word and tone in two ballads by Irving Berlin --
Benjamin Sears: The origins of "Easter parade" --
Cleve Sallendar: G-A-W-D bless A-M-E-R-I-K-E-R! --
"No right to a personal interest in 'God bless America, '" Berlin is told --
Excerpts from Stokowski, here for concert tonight, praises martial, folk songs; likes to play for soldiers --
Irving Berlin orders song word change --
Richard Rodgers: Excerpt from musical stages --
Ethel Merman, as told to Pete Martin: Excerpt from who could ask for anything more --
Brooks Atkinson: On Annie get your gun --
Harold Arlen and Ralph Blane: Verse to "Halloween" --
John Russell Taylor and Arthur Jackson: Chapter excerpt from the Hollywood musical on Fred Astaire --
Fred Astaire: Excerpt from steps in time. Part III: The melody lingers on: Later years --
Joshua Logan: A ninetieth-birthday salute to the master of American slang --
Nancy Caldwell Sorel: First encounters: Irving Berlin and George Gershwin --
Mark Steyn: Excerpts from top hat and tails --
Marilyn Berger: Berlin at 100: Life on a high note --
Murray Kempton: Bit of blues for ballads of Berlin --
Josh Rubins: Genius without tears --
Arthur Maisel: Irving Berlin (1888-1989) --
Edward Sorel: Cartoon, "September 22, 1989" --
Part IV: Irving Berlin in his own words --
Irving Berlin: How to write ragtime songs --
Irving Berlin: Song and sorrow are playmates --
Frank Ward O'Malley: Irving Berlin gives nine rules for writing popular songs --
Isaac Goldberg: Excerpt from words and music from Irving Berlin --
Irving Berlin: Selected letters --
Irving Berlin: Irving Berlin's insomnia --
Lead sheet for "Soft lights and sweet music."
Series Title: Readers on American musicians.
Responsibility: edited by Benjamin Sears.
More information:

Abstract:

Without any formal training in music composition, Irving Berlin took a knack for music and turned it into the most successful songwriting career in American history. Berlin was the first Tin Pan Alley songwriter to go uptown to Broadway with a complete musical score (Watch Your Step in 1914); he is the only songwriter to build a theater exclusively for his own work (The Music Box); and his name appears above the title of his Broadway shows and Hollywood films (Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn), still a rare honor for songwriters. Berlin is also notable due the length of his career in American Song; he sold his first song at the age of 18 and passed away at the age of 101 having outlived several of his own copyrights. Throughout his career, Berlin showed that a popular song need not be of a lesser quality than songs informed by the principles of "classical" music composition. Forty years after his last published song many of his songs remain popular and several have even entered folk song status, something no other 20th-century American songwriter can claim. As one of the most seminal figures of twentieth century, both in the world of music and in American culture more generally, and as one of the rare songwriters equally successful with popular songs, Broadway shows, and Hollywood scores, Irving Berlin is the subject of an enormous corpus of writing, scattered throughout countless publications and archives. A noted performer and interpreter of Berlin's works, Benjamin Sears has unprecedented familiarity with these sources and brings together in this Reader a broad range of the most insightful primary and secondary materials. Grouped together according to the chronology of Berlin's life and work, each section and article features a critical introduction to orient the reader and contextualize the materials within the framework of American musical history. Taken as a whole, the writings--many by Berlin himself--provide a new perspective on Berlin that highlights his musical genius in the context of his artistic development [Publisher description].

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[Sears] collects an abundance of documentary evidence ... articles, anecdotes, analyses and reminiscences that build a compelling, if necessarily imcomplete, portrait of Berlin. Martin Levin, Times Read more...

 
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Linked Data


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schema:description"Richard Barrios: Excerpt from chapter "The march of time" in a song in the dark -- Howard Pollack: Unity of word and tone in two ballads by Irving Berlin -- Benjamin Sears: The origins of "Easter parade" -- Cleve Sallendar: G-A-W-D bless A-M-E-R-I-K-E-R! -- "No right to a personal interest in 'God bless America, '" Berlin is told -- Excerpts from Stokowski, here for concert tonight, praises martial, folk songs; likes to play for soldiers -- Irving Berlin orders song word change -- Richard Rodgers: Excerpt from musical stages -- Ethel Merman, as told to Pete Martin: Excerpt from who could ask for anything more -- Brooks Atkinson: On Annie get your gun -- Harold Arlen and Ralph Blane: Verse to "Halloween" -- John Russell Taylor and Arthur Jackson: Chapter excerpt from the Hollywood musical on Fred Astaire -- Fred Astaire: Excerpt from steps in time."@en
schema:description"Part III: The melody lingers on: Later years -- Joshua Logan: A ninetieth-birthday salute to the master of American slang -- Nancy Caldwell Sorel: First encounters: Irving Berlin and George Gershwin -- Mark Steyn: Excerpts from top hat and tails -- Marilyn Berger: Berlin at 100: Life on a high note -- Murray Kempton: Bit of blues for ballads of Berlin -- Josh Rubins: Genius without tears -- Arthur Maisel: Irving Berlin (1888-1989) -- Edward Sorel: Cartoon, "September 22, 1989" -- Part IV: Irving Berlin in his own words -- Irving Berlin: How to write ragtime songs -- Irving Berlin: Song and sorrow are playmates -- Frank Ward O'Malley: Irving Berlin gives nine rules for writing popular songs -- Isaac Goldberg: Excerpt from words and music from Irving Berlin -- Irving Berlin: Selected letters -- Irving Berlin: Irving Berlin's insomnia -- Lead sheet for "Soft lights and sweet music.""@en
schema:description"Part I: Musical demon: Early years -- Ward Morehouse: A trip to Chinatown with Irving Berlin -- Rennold Wolf:: The boy who revived ragtime -- Edward Jablonski: "Alexander" and Irving -- Charles Hamm: Excerpt from Alexander and his band -- "Madam Critic": Review of watch you step -- Harry B. Smith: Excerpt from first nights and first editions -- Margaret Knapp: Watch your step: Irving Berlin's 1914 musical -- Ghost of Verdi interviewed: Tells how he suffered nightly -- Robert Baral: Fond memory: Those Music Box Revues -- Robert Benchley: Letter about the music box -- S.I. deKrafft: "Yes, we have no bananas" in grand opera setting -- Part II: Blue skies: Middle years -- George S. Kaufman: Memoir -- Letter from Jerome Kern to Alexander Woollcott, from the story of Irving Berlin -- Richard Rodgers: Excerpt from musical stages."@en
schema:description"Without any formal training in music composition, Irving Berlin took a knack for music and turned it into the most successful songwriting career in American history. Berlin was the first Tin Pan Alley songwriter to go uptown to Broadway with a complete musical score (Watch Your Step in 1914); he is the only songwriter to build a theater exclusively for his own work (The Music Box); and his name appears above the title of his Broadway shows and Hollywood films (Irving Berlin's Holiday Inn), still a rare honor for songwriters. Berlin is also notable due the length of his career in American Song; he sold his first song at the age of 18 and passed away at the age of 101 having outlived several of his own copyrights. Throughout his career, Berlin showed that a popular song need not be of a lesser quality than songs informed by the principles of "classical" music composition. Forty years after his last published song many of his songs remain popular and several have even entered folk song status, something no other 20th-century American songwriter can claim. As one of the most seminal figures of twentieth century, both in the world of music and in American culture more generally, and as one of the rare songwriters equally successful with popular songs, Broadway shows, and Hollywood scores, Irving Berlin is the subject of an enormous corpus of writing, scattered throughout countless publications and archives. A noted performer and interpreter of Berlin's works, Benjamin Sears has unprecedented familiarity with these sources and brings together in this Reader a broad range of the most insightful primary and secondary materials. Grouped together according to the chronology of Berlin's life and work, each section and article features a critical introduction to orient the reader and contextualize the materials within the framework of American musical history. Taken as a whole, the writings--many by Berlin himself--provide a new perspective on Berlin that highlights his musical genius in the context of his artistic development [Publisher description]."@en
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