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Israel on the Appomattox : a southern experiment in Black freedom from the 1790s through the Civil War

Author: Melvin Patrick Ely
Publisher: New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 2004.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Thomas Jefferson condemned slavery but denied that whites and liberated blacks could live together in harmony. Jefferson's young cousin Richard Randolph and ninety African Americans set out to prove the sage of Monticello wrong. When Randolph died in 1796, he left land for his formidable bondman Hercules White and for dozens of other slaves. Freed, they could build new lives there alongside white neighbors and  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Ely, Melvin Patrick.
Israel on the Appomattox.
New York : Knopf : Distributed by Random House, 2004
(OCoLC)607458482
Named Person: White family.; Richard Randolph
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Melvin Patrick Ely
ISBN: 0679447385 9780679447382
OCLC Number: 53483636
Description: x, 640 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
Contents: The view from Israel Hill, 1863 --
Liberty and happiness --
The promised land --
Work --
Challenges --
Law and order --
Worldviews --
Progress and struggle --
Appomattox and the new birth of freedom --
The search for meaning in the southern free black experience.
Responsibility: Melvin Patrick Ely.
More information:

Abstract:

"Thomas Jefferson condemned slavery but denied that whites and liberated blacks could live together in harmony. Jefferson's young cousin Richard Randolph and ninety African Americans set out to prove the sage of Monticello wrong. When Randolph died in 1796, he left land for his formidable bondman Hercules White and for dozens of other slaves. Freed, they could build new lives there alongside white neighbors and other blacks who had gained their liberty earlier." "Fittingly, the Randolph freedpeople called their promised land Israel Hill. These black Israelites and other free African Americans established farms, plied skilled trades, and navigated the Appomattox River in freight-carrying "batteaux." Hercules White's son Sam and other free blacks bought and sold boats, land, and buildings, and they won the respect of whites." "Melvin Patrick Ely captures a series of personal and public dramas: free black and white people do business with one another, sue each other, work side by side for equal wages, join forces to found a Baptist congregation, move West together, and occasionally settle down as man and wife. Even still-enslaved blacks who face charges of raping or killing whites sometimes find ardent white defenders." "Yet slavery's long shadow darkens this landscape in unpredictable ways. After Nat Turner's slave revolt, county officials confiscate and auction off free blacks' weapons - and then vote to give the proceeds to the blacks themselves. One black Israelite marries an enslaved woman and watches, powerless, as a white master carries three of their children off to Missouri; a free black miller has to bid for his own wife at a public auction. Proslavery hawks falsely depict Israel Hill to the nation as a degenerate place whose supposed failure proves blacks are unfit for freedom. The Confederate Army compels free black men to build fortifications far from home, until Lee finally surrenders to Grant a few miles from Israel Hill."--BOOK JACKET.

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schema:reviewBody""Thomas Jefferson condemned slavery but denied that whites and liberated blacks could live together in harmony. Jefferson's young cousin Richard Randolph and ninety African Americans set out to prove the sage of Monticello wrong. When Randolph died in 1796, he left land for his formidable bondman Hercules White and for dozens of other slaves. Freed, they could build new lives there alongside white neighbors and other blacks who had gained their liberty earlier." "Fittingly, the Randolph freedpeople called their promised land Israel Hill. These black Israelites and other free African Americans established farms, plied skilled trades, and navigated the Appomattox River in freight-carrying "batteaux." Hercules White's son Sam and other free blacks bought and sold boats, land, and buildings, and they won the respect of whites." "Melvin Patrick Ely captures a series of personal and public dramas: free black and white people do business with one another, sue each other, work side by side for equal wages, join forces to found a Baptist congregation, move West together, and occasionally settle down as man and wife. Even still-enslaved blacks who face charges of raping or killing whites sometimes find ardent white defenders." "Yet slavery's long shadow darkens this landscape in unpredictable ways. After Nat Turner's slave revolt, county officials confiscate and auction off free blacks' weapons - and then vote to give the proceeds to the blacks themselves. One black Israelite marries an enslaved woman and watches, powerless, as a white master carries three of their children off to Missouri; a free black miller has to bid for his own wife at a public auction. Proslavery hawks falsely depict Israel Hill to the nation as a degenerate place whose supposed failure proves blacks are unfit for freedom. The Confederate Army compels free black men to build fortifications far from home, until Lee finally surrenders to Grant a few miles from Israel Hill."--BOOK JACKET."
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