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Issues of death : mortality and identity in English Renaissance tragedy

Author: Michael Neill
Publisher: Oxford : Clarendon Press ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Death, like most experiences that we think of as 'natural', is a product of the human imagination: all animals die, but only human beings suffer Death; and what they suffer is shaped by their own time and culture. Tragedy was one of the principal instruments through which the culture of early modern England imagined the encounter with mortality. The essays in this book approach the theatrical reinvention of Death  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Neill
ISBN: 0198183860 9780198183860
OCLC Number: 37106725
Description: xii, 404 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Responsibility: Michael Neill.
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Abstract:

An analysis of the major plays by Marlowe, Kyd, Shakespeare, Webster, Middleton and Ford, which explores the relation of tragedy to the macabre tradition, to the apocalyptic displays of the anatomy  Read more...

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subtle, patient, and learned study of early modern English tragedy ... Neill's work is exemplary and important ... Issues of Death is the most consistently illuminating and rewarding book on English Read more...

 
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schema:reviewBody""Death, like most experiences that we think of as 'natural', is a product of the human imagination: all animals die, but only human beings suffer Death; and what they suffer is shaped by their own time and culture. Tragedy was one of the principal instruments through which the culture of early modern England imagined the encounter with mortality. The essays in this book approach the theatrical reinvention of Death from three perspectives. Those in Part 1 explore Death as a trope of apocalypse - a moment of un-veiling or dis-covery that is figured both in the fearful nakedness of the Danse Macabre and in the shameful 'openings' enacted in the new theatres of anatomy." "In Part 2, Neill explores the psychological and affective consequences of tragedy's fiercely end-driven narrative in a number of plays where a longing for narrative closure is pitched against a particularly intense dread of ending." "Finally, Part 3 focuses on the way tragedy articulates its challenge to the undifferentiating power of death through conventions and motifs borrowed from the funeral arts."--BOOK JACKET."
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