skip to content
The jackpot Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The jackpot

Author: Phoebe EphronHenry EphronSamuel G EngelWalter LangLionel NewmanAll authors
Publisher: United States : Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp., ©1950.
Edition/Format:   Film : Film   Visual material : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Bill and Amy Lawrence live with their children, Phyllis and Tommy, in Glenville, Indiana, where Bill works at the Woodruff Department Store. Bill is bored by the routine aspects of their life and feels that their future is already programmed. One day at the store, Bill and co-worker Fred Burns are summoned to Woodruff's office. Woodruff is concerned because business is slow and wants them to come up with ideas to  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Comedies
Features
Drama
Material Type: Film
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Phoebe Ephron; Henry Ephron; Samuel G Engel; Walter Lang; Lionel Newman; Joseph La Shelle; Lyle Wheeler; Joseph C Wright; Thomas Little; Stuart Reiss; J Watson Webb; Charles Le Maire; Edward Stevenson; Earle Hagen; Ben Nye; Fred Sersen; George Leverett; Roger Heman; James Stewart; Barbara Hale; James Gleason; Fred Clark; Alan Mowbray; Patricia Medina; Natalie Wood; Tommy Rettig; Robert Gist; Lyle Talbot; John Qualen; Fritz Feld; Minerva Urecal; Milton Parsons; Andrew Tombes; Dick Curtis; Ken Christy; Franklin Parker; Robert Bice; Tony De Marco; Jay Barney; Ann Doran; Sam Edwards; John McNulty; Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation.
OCLC Number: 81162628
Notes: Comedy; feature.
"Based on an article in the New Yorker by John McNulty."
Bracketed cast credits were supplied from xerox of studio records provided by AFI cataloger.
"Western Electric Recording."
Playing time on release was 85 min., according to: Film daily yearbook, 1951.
"Prod. no. A-603"--Leader?
Copyright: Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp.; 8Nov50; LP549.
"Approved, MPAA, certificate no. 14685."
Credits: Music, Lionel Newman; director of photography, Joseph la Shelle. Art direction, Lyle Wheeler, Joseph C. Wright; set decorations, Thomas Little, Stuart Reiss; film editor, J. Watson Webb, Jr.; wardrobe direction, Charles LeMaire; costumes designed by Edward Stevenson; orchestration, Earle Hagen; makeup artist, Ben Nye; special photographic effects, Fred Sersen; sound, George Leverett, Roger Heman.
Cast: James Stewart [Bill Lawrence], Barbara Hale [Amy Lawrence]. With James Gleason [Harry Summers], Fred Clark [Mr. Woodruff], Alan Mowbray [Leslie], Patricia Medina [Hilda Jones], Natalie Wood [Phyllis Lawrence], Tommy Rettig [Tommy Lawrence], Robert Gist [Pete Spooner], Lyle Talbot [Fred Burns]. [Charles Tannen (Al Vogel); Bigelow Sayre (Captain Sullivan); Dick Cogan (Mr. Brown); Jewel Rose (Mrs. Brown); Eddie Firestone (Mr. McDougall); Estelle Etterre (Mrs. McDougall); Claud Stroud (Herman Wertheim); Caryl Lincoln (Susan Wertheim); Valerie Mark (Mary Vogel); Joan Miller (Mabel Spooner); Walter Baldwin (watch buyer); Syd Saylor (Ernie, mailman); John Qualen (Mr. Ferguson); Fritz Feld (long-haired pianist); Kathryn Sheldon (Mrs. Simpkins); Robert Dudley (Mr. Simpkins); Billy Wayne (photographer); Minerva Urecal (strange woman); Milton Parsons (piano player); Kim Spalding (Mr. Dexter); Dulce Daye (Mrs. Dexter); Andrew Tombes (Pritchett); Marjorie Holliday (telephone operator); Peggy O'Connor (salesgirl); Harry Carter, Colin Ward (bit men); Jack Roper, Dick Curtis, Guy Way (moving men); June Evans (bit washerwoman); Ken Christy (bit man); Elizabeth Flournoy (bit woman); Harry Hines (elevator man); Carol Savage (switchboard operator); Franklin "Pinky" Parker (poker player); Robert Bice (policeman); John Bleifer (bald man); Tony de Marco (bookie announcer); Bill Nelson (truck driver); Phil van Zandt (Flick Morgan); Tudor Owen.
(Policeman); Jack Mather (first detective); Jay Barney (second detective); John Roy (policeman); Ann Doran (Miss Bowen); Jerry Hausner (Al Stern); Billy Lechner (Johnny, office boy); Frances Budd (saleslady); George Conrad, Sam Edwards (parking lot attendants)].
Other Titles: Jackpot (Motion picture : 1950)
Jack-pot (Motion picture : 1950)
Responsibility: Twentieth Century-Fox presents ; screen play by Phoebe and Henry Ephron ; produced by Samuel G. Engel ; directed by Walter Lang.

Abstract:

"Bill and Amy Lawrence live with their children, Phyllis and Tommy, in Glenville, Indiana, where Bill works at the Woodruff Department Store. Bill is bored by the routine aspects of their life and feels that their future is already programmed. One day at the store, Bill and co-worker Fred Burns are summoned to Woodruff's office. Woodruff is concerned because business is slow and wants them to come up with ideas to improve the situation. He also informs them that he will be going to Europe the following month and that one of them will be selected to run the store in his absence and will receive a promotion. Later, at home, Bill receives a phone call from New York asking him if he will be home that evening to listen to the Federal Broadcasting System's quiz show, Name the mystery husband as his number has been selected to be called as part of the $24,000 jackpot contest. Bill assumes the call is a joke being played by one of his friends, who will be present for the regular canasta game that evening, but nevertheless phones his friend, newspaperman Harry Summers, for tips on the mystery husband's identity and learns that it might be either band leader Harry James or writer Charles MacArthur. As the program begins, the card game crowd gathers around the radio, anxious to hear if anyone can guess the identity of the mystery husband, whose disguised voice has been stumping contestants for ten weeks. The program is almost over when Bill's phone finally rings. Bill has to answer a riddle before qualifying to guess the mystery husband and Tommy supplies the answer. Bill then guesses that Harry James is the mystery husband and wins. Prizes are soon delivered to the Lawrence home, and a Mr. Leslie of Harrington Interiors arrives to make over their house. Crowds gather at the house to watch several trucks unloading various items, including a washing machine and a piano. After Harry arrives with a photographer to do a story for the local paper, a taxi delivers another prize, the glamorous Hilda Jones, who has come to paint Bill's portrait. Suddenly, Bill discovers that he will have to pay income tax on all his prizes and consults a tax expert, who tells him that his liability will be $7,000. As his annual salary is $7,500. Bill and Amy decide to sell off most of the prizes. In the meantime, rumors circulate about Bill posing for Hilda, but she is actually painting a portrait of Amy from a photograph Bill has given to her. When Bill sells one of the watches he has won to a store customer, Woodruff tells him to desist. To counteract Bill's 'involvement' with Hilda, Amy goes to dinner with Leslie. Bill then takes Amy to see the portrait at Hilda's hotel room, but when Hilda answers his knock at her door very affectionately, Amy leaves in a huff. Several strange people come to the house to view the numerous items for sale. When Bill finds he has to go to Chicago on business, Harry tells him that a sharp character by the name of Flick Morgan might buy some of the rings and watches from him. Bill goes to see Flick, who runs an illegal bookie operation behind a candy store. As Morgan examines a ring, the place is raided by the police, and he takes off with the ring. The police find other jewelry and watches in Bill's possession and arrest him. Meanwhile, the man who bought the watch from Bill has brought it back to Woodruff complaining that it doesn't work and consequently, when Woodruff receives a call from the Chicago police asking to verify Bill's employment, he denies knowing him. After Bill spends a night in jail, Harry comes to clear him and they drive back to Glenville. Along the way, they stop for a drink and Bill has one too many. Harry then phones one of Bill's friends to arrange a surprise wedding anniversary party for that evening. However, Bill and Amy have a fight, and when the party guests arrive, they find Bill leaving, suitcase in hand. The next day, Hilda delivers the portrait and Amy is surprised that it is of her. Hilda tells her that there was nothing between Bill and her and that Amy should hold onto him. When a lawyer, Pritchett, later arrives at the house saying that Bill is on his way, both Bill and Amy assume that Pritchett is there to negotiate divorce terms. Pritchett, in fact, represents Flick Morgan, who has lost the ring he was examining when the raid started. Pritchett tells Bill that Morgan is very grateful to him for not implicating him in the raid and wishes to pay Bill the full amount he asked for the ring, $5,000. After Bill realizes he can use this money to pay his tax liability, he and Amy reunite. Woodruff then drops by to say that his statement to the police was intended only as a joke. Although Bill socks him, Woodruff later promotes him to vice-president"--AFI catalog, 1941-1950.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/81162628>
library:oclcnum"81162628"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:Movie
rdf:valueUnknown value: mot
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:alternateName"Jack-pot (Motion picture : 1950)"@en
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1950"
schema:datePublished"1950"
schema:description""Bill and Amy Lawrence live with their children, Phyllis and Tommy, in Glenville, Indiana, where Bill works at the Woodruff Department Store. Bill is bored by the routine aspects of their life and feels that their future is already programmed. One day at the store, Bill and co-worker Fred Burns are summoned to Woodruff's office. Woodruff is concerned because business is slow and wants them to come up with ideas to improve the situation. He also informs them that he will be going to Europe the following month and that one of them will be selected to run the store in his absence and will receive a promotion. Later, at home, Bill receives a phone call from New York asking him if he will be home that evening to listen to the Federal Broadcasting System's quiz show, Name the mystery husband as his number has been selected to be called as part of the $24,000 jackpot contest. Bill assumes the call is a joke being played by one of his friends, who will be present for the regular canasta game that evening, but nevertheless phones his friend, newspaperman Harry Summers, for tips on the mystery husband's identity and learns that it might be either band leader Harry James or writer Charles MacArthur. As the program begins, the card game crowd gathers around the radio, anxious to hear if anyone can guess the identity of the mystery husband, whose disguised voice has been stumping contestants for ten weeks. The program is almost over when Bill's phone finally rings. Bill has to answer a riddle before qualifying to guess the mystery husband and Tommy supplies the answer. Bill then guesses that Harry James is the mystery husband and wins. Prizes are soon delivered to the Lawrence home, and a Mr. Leslie of Harrington Interiors arrives to make over their house. Crowds gather at the house to watch several trucks unloading various items, including a washing machine and a piano. After Harry arrives with a photographer to do a story for the local paper, a taxi delivers another prize, the glamorous Hilda Jones, who has come to paint Bill's portrait. Suddenly, Bill discovers that he will have to pay income tax on all his prizes and consults a tax expert, who tells him that his liability will be $7,000. As his annual salary is $7,500. Bill and Amy decide to sell off most of the prizes. In the meantime, rumors circulate about Bill posing for Hilda, but she is actually painting a portrait of Amy from a photograph Bill has given to her. When Bill sells one of the watches he has won to a store customer, Woodruff tells him to desist. To counteract Bill's 'involvement' with Hilda, Amy goes to dinner with Leslie. Bill then takes Amy to see the portrait at Hilda's hotel room, but when Hilda answers his knock at her door very affectionately, Amy leaves in a huff. Several strange people come to the house to view the numerous items for sale. When Bill finds he has to go to Chicago on business, Harry tells him that a sharp character by the name of Flick Morgan might buy some of the rings and watches from him. Bill goes to see Flick, who runs an illegal bookie operation behind a candy store. As Morgan examines a ring, the place is raided by the police, and he takes off with the ring. The police find other jewelry and watches in Bill's possession and arrest him. Meanwhile, the man who bought the watch from Bill has brought it back to Woodruff complaining that it doesn't work and consequently, when Woodruff receives a call from the Chicago police asking to verify Bill's employment, he denies knowing him. After Bill spends a night in jail, Harry comes to clear him and they drive back to Glenville. Along the way, they stop for a drink and Bill has one too many. Harry then phones one of Bill's friends to arrange a surprise wedding anniversary party for that evening. However, Bill and Amy have a fight, and when the party guests arrive, they find Bill leaving, suitcase in hand. The next day, Hilda delivers the portrait and Amy is surprised that it is of her. Hilda tells her that there was nothing between Bill and her and that Amy should hold onto him. When a lawyer, Pritchett, later arrives at the house saying that Bill is on his way, both Bill and Amy assume that Pritchett is there to negotiate divorce terms. Pritchett, in fact, represents Flick Morgan, who has lost the ring he was examining when the raid started. Pritchett tells Bill that Morgan is very grateful to him for not implicating him in the raid and wishes to pay Bill the full amount he asked for the ring, $5,000. After Bill realizes he can use this money to pay his tax liability, he and Amy reunite. Woodruff then drops by to say that his statement to the police was intended only as a joke. Although Bill socks him, Woodruff later promotes him to vice-president"--AFI catalog, 1941-1950."@en
schema:exampleOfWork
<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/477137333>
schema:name"Jackpot (Motion picture : 1950)"@en
schema:genre"Features"@en
schema:genre"Drama"@en
schema:genre"Comedies"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The jackpot"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.