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James Madison, Dolley Madison, and James Monroe letters, 1804-1840.

Author: Charles Dexter ClevelandTench CoxeAnne Payne CuttsL Henry Cutts, MrsRichard CuttsAll authors
Edition/Format:   Archival material : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Dolley writes chiefly to her sister Anna Payne Cutts and her cousins Mrs. Van Zandt and Mrs. L. Henry Cutts, as well as Mrs. Richard Smith and Mrs. Thornton.
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Named Person: Aaron Burr; Charles Dexter Cleveland; Maria Eppes; Thomas Jefferson; James Lewis; James Madison; Dolley Madison; John Sinclair, Sir; John Payne Todd; Lucy Payne Washington Todd; Thomas Todd
Document Type: Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Charles Dexter Cleveland; Tench Coxe; Anne Payne Cutts; L Henry Cutts, Mrs; Richard Cutts; Joseph Delaplaine; Dolley Madison; James Madison; John Mason; James Monroe; Richard Smith; John Borlase Warren, Sir
OCLC Number: 48936342
Notes: Forms part of the Tracy W. McGregor Library Autograph Collection.
Description: 28 items.
Other Titles: Dolley Madison letters
James Madison letters
James Monroe letters

Abstract:

Dolley writes chiefly to her sister Anna Payne Cutts and her cousins Mrs. Van Zandt and Mrs. L. Henry Cutts, as well as Mrs. Richard Smith and Mrs. Thornton.

Dolley writes primarily concerning family matters. Topics include wigs; bad roads and swollen rivers; a letter from Thomas Jefferson about the death of Maria Jefferson Eppes; James Madison's poor health; her problems with her knee, rheumatism and her eyes; and her "ancient terror" of the Society of Friends.

Also Thomas Jefferson's migraines; Aaron Burr on his way to Richmond for trial; the marriage of Lucy Payne Washington and Thomas Todd; Fedralists refusal to enter the Madisons' doors; her sister's childbirth; "curls and silk"; and her son Payne and his financial troubles.

James Madison writes to Richard Cutts regarding plans to leave for Rockfish Gap and a package of Talavera wheat. He asks Joseph Delaplaine to send him some manuscripts to review for inaccuracies and two pamphlets, and thanks him for a volume of poetry. As rector of the the University of Virginia he thanks C.D. Cleveland for a copy of "Epitome of Grecian Antiquities" for the University library.

James Monroe cannot meet withTench Coxe but informs him that changes considered for the Treasury Department have been stricken out. Monroe writes to General John Mason that it was impossible to make any other financial arrangements to pay him other than to authorize his agent, Major James Lewis, to sell some property above Charlottesville and a large tract in Kentucky. In a letter to an unidentified recipient he refuses to sanction the dedication of a book to him by Sir John Sinclair.

In a letter to Sir John Borlase Warren Monroe discusses the exchange of prisoners of war between Great Britain and the United States and complaints regarding the conduct of the British government towards American seamen. In a letter to Mr. Agg, Monroe informs him that he has made some changes in a document before publishing in the "Whig."

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Linked Data


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