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Jane Austen and food

Author: Maggie Lane
Publisher: London ; Rio Grande : Hambledon Press, 1995.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Publisher Description (unedited publisher data) What was the significance of the pyramid of fruit which confronted Elizabeth Bennet at Pemberley? Or of the cold beef eaten by Willoughby on his journey of repentance to see Marianne? Why is it so appropriate that the scene of Emma's disgrace should be a picnic, and how do the different styles of housekeeping in Mansfield Park engage with the social issues of the day?  Read more...
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Named Person: Jane Austen; Jane Austen; Jane Austen; Jane Austen; Jane Austen; Jane Austen
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Maggie Lane
ISBN: 1852851244 9781852851248
OCLC Number: 32087496
Description: xv, 184 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Domestic economy in Jane Austen's life --
Mealtimes, menus, manners --
From white soup to whipt syllabub --
Greed and gender --
The sweets of housekeeping --
Town and country hospitality --
Food as symbol --
The significance of food in 'Emma'.
Responsibility: Maggie Lane.
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Abstract:

Publisher Description (unedited publisher data) What was the significance of the pyramid of fruit which confronted Elizabeth Bennet at Pemberley? Or of the cold beef eaten by Willoughby on his journey of repentance to see Marianne? Why is it so appropriate that the scene of Emma's disgrace should be a picnic, and how do the different styles of housekeeping in Mansfield Park engage with the social issues of the day? While Jane Austen does not luxuriate in cataloguing meals in the way of Victorian novelists, food in fact plays a vital part in her novels. Her plots, being domestic, are deeply imbued with the rituals of giving and sharing meals. The attitudes of her characters to eating, to housekeeping and to hospitality are important indicators of their moral worth. In a practice both economical and poetic, Jane Austen sometimes uses specific foodstuffs to symbolise certain qualities at heightened moments in the text. This culminates in the artistic triumph of Emma, in which repeated references to food not only contribute to the solidity of her imagined world, but provide an extended metaphor for the interdependence of a community. In this original, lively and well-researched book, Maggie Lane not only offers a fresh perspective on the novels, but illuminates a fascinating period of food history, as England stood on the brink of urbanisation, middle-class luxury, and change in the role of women. Ranging over topics from greed and gender to mealtimes and manners, and drawing on the novels, letters and Austen family papers, she also discusses Jane Austen's own ambivalent attitude to the provision and enjoyment of food.

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