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Japan : in the land of the brokenhearted

Author: Michael Shapiro
Publisher: New York : H. Holt, ©1989.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Japanese and Westerners approach the world, their lives, their friendships, in such profoundly different ways that they often end up confusing and hurting each other. Many Westerners have come to Japan seeking cultural perfection, only to have their innocent visions shattered. Among the most famous was Lafcadio Hearn, who arrived at the turn of the century and the beginning of Japan's westernization. His presence,  Read more...
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Details

Named Person: Lafcadio Hearn; Michael Shapiro; Lafcadio Hearn; Michael Shapiro
Material Type: Biography
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Shapiro
ISBN: 0805003959 9780805003956
OCLC Number: 18739409
Description: vii, 245 p. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Yokohama --
Matsue --
Kumamoto --
Kobe --
Tokyo,
Responsibility: Michael Shapiro.

Abstract:

Japanese and Westerners approach the world, their lives, their friendships, in such profoundly different ways that they often end up confusing and hurting each other. Many Westerners have come to Japan seeking cultural perfection, only to have their innocent visions shattered. Among the most famous was Lafcadio Hearn, who arrived at the turn of the century and the beginning of Japan's westernization. His presence, through his writings, serves as the author's alter ego. Five contemporary Americans and several surprising Japanese lead the reader deep within the workings of a homogenous society. There is the baseball player baffled that his team doesn't protest when an umpire calls a ball a strike; the businessman who attempts to move his stubborn Japanese boss into new markets; the woman who defies the alien fingerprinting law and dares a stunned legal system to through her into the workhouse; and the missionary couple who find that whatever religion their community professes outwardly, their only true belief lies in "Japanesism"--a club to which no foreigner can be admitted.

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Linked Data


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