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Jarhead : a Marine's chronicle of the Gulf War and other battles

Author: Anthony Swofford
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2003.
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
When the marines - or "jarheads," as they call themselves - were sent in 1990 to Saudi Arabia to fight the Iraqis, [the author] was there, with a hundred-pound pack on his shoulders and a sniper's rifle in his hands. It was one misery upon another. He lived in sand for six months, his girlfriend back home betrayed him for a scrawny hotel clerk, he was punished by boredom and fear, he considered suicide, he pulled a  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Personal narratives, American
Named Person: Anthony Swofford
Material Type: Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Anthony Swofford
OCLC Number: 53457746
Notes: Originally published: New York : Scribner, c2003.
Description: 1 sound disc : digital, mono. ; 4 3/4 in.
Responsibility: Anthony Swofford.

Abstract:

When the marines - or "jarheads," as they call themselves - were sent in 1990 to Saudi Arabia to fight the Iraqis, [the author] was there, with a hundred-pound pack on his shoulders and a sniper's rifle in his hands. It was one misery upon another. He lived in sand for six months, his girlfriend back home betrayed him for a scrawny hotel clerk, he was punished by boredom and fear, he considered suicide, he pulled a gun on one of his fellow marines, and he was shot at by both Iraqis and Americans. At the end of the war, [he] hiked for miles through a landscape of incinerated Iraqi soldiers and later was nearly killed in a booby-trapped Iraqi bunker. [He] weaves this experience of war with vivid accounts of boot camp (which included physical abuse by his drill instructor), reflections on the mythos of the marines, and remembrances of battles with lovers and family. As engagement with the Iraqis draws closer, he is forced to consider what it is to be an American, a soldier, a son of a soldier, and a man. Unlike the real-time print and television coverage of the Gulf War, which was highly scripted by the Pentagon, [his] account subverts the conventional wisdom that U.S. military interventions are now merely surgical insertions of superior forces that result in few American casualties. Jarhead insists we remember the Americans who are in fact wounded or killed, the fields of smoking enemy corpses left behind, and the continuing difficulty that American soldiers have reentering civilian life. A harrowing yet inspiring portrait of a tormented consciousness struggling for inner peace, [this book] will elbow for room on that short shelf of American war classics that includes Philip Caputo's A Rumor of War and Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried, and be admired not only for the raw beauty of its prose but also for the depth of its pained heart.-Dust jacket.

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Linked Data


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