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Jazz. Episode 10, A masterpiece by midnight

Author: Ken Burns
Publisher: 2001.
Edition/Format:   Film : Film   Visual material : English : [PBS Home Video and Warner Home Video version of episode originally broadcast in January of 2001 (on January 30, 2001, on KCET Los Angeles)]
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"By the early 1960s, jazz is in trouble. Young people now overwhelmingly prefer rock 'n roll--though Louis Armstrong manages to outsell the Beatles with Hello Dolly and Stan Getz helps boost a craze for Bossa Nova. Desperate for work, some musicians go into exile overseas, including the tenor saxophone master, Dexter Gordon. Critics divide the music into antagonistic 'schools'--Dixieland, swing, bebop, hard bop,  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: British television programs
Emmy Award nominees
Documentaries and factual films and video
Named Person: Louis Armstrong; Stan Getz; Dexter Gordon; Max Roach; Charles Mingus; John Coltrane; Miles Davis; Duke Ellington; Wynton Marsalis
Material Type: Film
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Ken Burns
OCLC Number: 423546730
Notes: Documentary.
Copyright notice on videocassette sleeve: c2000, Florentine Films; artwork c2000, Warner Home Video.
Emmy Award nominee, Prime Time.
Credits: Episode editors, Tricia Reidy and Sarah E. Hill; supervising film editor, Paul Barnes; cinematography, Buddy Squires and Ken Burns.
Performer(s): Narrated by Keith David.
Other Titles: Jazz (Television program : 2001).
Masterpiece by midnight.
Responsibility: a production of Florentine Films and WETA, Washington, D.C., in association with BBC ; a General Motors mark of excellence presentation ; a film by Ken Burns ; directed by Ken Burns ; written by Geoffrey C. Ward ; produced by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick ; co-producers, Peter Miller and Victoria Gohl ; associate producers, Sarah Botstein, Natalie Bullock Brown and Shola Lynch.

Abstract:

"By the early 1960s, jazz is in trouble. Young people now overwhelmingly prefer rock 'n roll--though Louis Armstrong manages to outsell the Beatles with Hello Dolly and Stan Getz helps boost a craze for Bossa Nova. Desperate for work, some musicians go into exile overseas, including the tenor saxophone master, Dexter Gordon. Critics divide the music into antagonistic 'schools'--Dixieland, swing, bebop, hard bop, modal, free, avant garde, and more. During the civil rights struggle, some artists mix music with social protest, including Max Roach, Charles Mingus, Archie Schepp, and the Art Ensemble of Chicago. John Coltrane dies young, and Miles Davis decides that if he cannot outsell rock musicians, he should join forces with them, creating the enormously popular music called 'fusion.' Both Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington pass away during the 1970s, and to some, jazz seems to die with them. But just when things seem most desperate, Dexter Gordon returns from Europe, and proves that there is still an audience for mainstream jazz, and a new generation of musicians, led by the trumpeter Wynton Marsalis, emerges, eager to express themselves within the music's great traditions. The musical journey that began in the dance halls and saloons and street parades of New Orleans in the early years of the 20th century continues--and shows no sign of slowing down. As it enters its second century, jazz is still alive, still changing and still swinging"--Videocassette sleeve.

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Linked Data


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