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Jazz : the American theme song

Author: James Lincoln Collier
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1993.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This book offers readers analysis of musical trends and styles, and explorations of the most potentially explosive issues in jazz today. In "Black, White, and Blue," Collier traces African and European influences on the evolution of jazz in a free-ranging discussion that takes him from the French colony of Saint Domingue (now Haiti) to the orderly classrooms where most music students study jazz today. He argues that  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Collier, James Lincoln, 1928-
Jazz.
New York : Oxford University Press, 1993
(OCoLC)654545236
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James Lincoln Collier
ISBN: 0195079434 9780195079432 0195079434 9780195079432 0195096355 9780195096354
OCLC Number: 27108002
Description: 326 pages ; 22 cm
Contents: The inevitability of jazz in America --
The rise of individualism and the jazz solo --
Going it alone --
Hot rhythm --
The embrace of show business --
Art and the academy --
Jazz and pop --
Black, white, and blue --
The critics --
Local jazz.
Responsibility: James Lincoln Collier.
More information:

Abstract:

This book offers readers analysis of musical trends and styles, and explorations of the most potentially explosive issues in jazz today. In "Black, White, and Blue," Collier traces African and European influences on the evolution of jazz in a free-ranging discussion that takes him from the French colony of Saint Domingue (now Haiti) to the orderly classrooms where most music students study jazz today. He argues that although jazz was originally devised by blacks from black folk music, jazz has long been a part of the cultural heritage of musicians and audiences of all races and classes, and is not black music per se. In another essay, Collier provides an analysis of the evolution of jazz criticism, and casts a skeptical eye on the credibility of the emerging "jazz canon" of critical writing and popular history. Other essays include explorations of jazz as an intrinsic and fundamental source of inspiration for American dance music, rock, and pop; the influence of show business on jazz, and vice versa; and the link between the rise of the jazz soloist and the new emphasis on individuality in the 1920s. --From publisher's description.

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